What do CLO’s really need to know about the learning ecosystem and how to best engage their employees? We’ve gathered 12 powerful stats about how workers truly learn and fuel their careers to help prepare you to meet the needs of the workforce. Click here to view our full research on how the workforce learns.

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Want more? Get new research on how the workforce really learns in 2016.

ATD reports that only 38% of learning and development (L&D) professionals think they’re ready to meet the needs of tomorrow’s learners.  This doesn’t mean traditional approaches to L&D are obsolete- they just aren’t enough anymore, at least not for today’s workers. To help L&D teams better engage employees, we surveyed 512 people to understand how today’s workforce really build their skills and fuels their careers.

We’re proud to release the research that will give you an in-depth analysis, and important insights on how today’s workers really learn at (and for) work.

In the report you’ll find 5 key findings, what you can do to take advantage of them, and a simple diagnostic to help you identify how ready you are today to meet the demands of tomorrow’s workforce.

Click here to download the report. Welcome to the future.

How the Workforce Learns

 

 

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Isentia, headquartered in Sydney, with offices in 12 countries from China to New Zealand, is Asia Pacific’s leading media intelligence company. Staying on top of industry trends is a high priority for the business, because their environment changes rapidly.

 

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The Challenge

Isentia’s media intelligence services range from software-as-a-service products to highly customized media insight, digital and content agency services. This translates into a wide range of skills across sales, client servicing, media operations, analysts, creative, IT, and HR. These team members work together to deliver media monitoring, intelligence and insights to over 5,000 clients across the Asia Pacific region.

The nature of Isentia’s business means its people need to be at the forefront of media and current events. The previous learning and development program was a series of generic classroom-based courses. This approach grew ever more challenging (logistically and financially) as Isentia became more geographically diverse and the needs of different functional areas moved beyond the standard suite of soft skills training.

Additionally, Isentia had purchased content from several top content providers like SalesDNA, Pluralsight and Lynda. There wasn’t a central location where everyone could access this content, or track usage across content providers. Isentia needed a solution that could restructure and group this training in a way that worked best for learners.

The primary challenge: find a cost-effective and impactful way to deliver relevant and tailored learning to diverse functional groups spread out across 12 countries.

 

The Solution

Helen Thomson, the Executive Director of Human Resources at Isentia, was looking for a better solution. Isentia wanted a way to empower every employee in the organization to be able to learn what they want, when they want, both for their current role and their future career aspirations – in a cost effective solution.

Helen became interested in Degreed because it offered a cost-effective, centralized learning solution that could meet the needs of the decentralized workforce at everyone’s own pace, and time zone.

With Degreed, Isentia would have the ability to:

  • Provide on-demand learning content to all of its team members regardless of their location.
  • Organize and structure learning content in meaningful ways for the team.
  • Provide a tool to their team members that genuinely empowers them to take control of their own development.
  • Crowdsource the creation of content and learning pathways using ‘experts’ within different functional areas within the organization.
  • Enable leaders and team members to recommend learning to each other and their peers.
  • Track and give credit for all learning, whether an online course, article, YouTube video, seminar attended, formal education and even on the job experience.
  • Tap into an existing ecosystem of learning content from around the world, including in content areas Isentia never would have had the capacity or funding to develop itself.
  • Create blended learning experiences that enhance the application of skills and knowledge while on the job.
  • Integrate and manage access to existing organization subscriptions to content from other online learning partners such as SalesDNA, Lynda and Pluralsight.
  • Enhance their value proposition as an employer by providing access to learning in almost any area that interests a team member.

The goal was to promote self-directed learning, and empower employees to find what they need, when they need it – giving employees the tools they need to grow and progress in their career.

Degreed’s ready-made ecosystem of content was a key solution for Isentia’s needs. Because Degreed provides content for diverse job functions, Isentia could start offering learning resources to support diverse skillsets- without breaking the budget on dedicated L&D resources to build content. Degreed also offered the ability to aggregate content from any source in a way that made the most sense for Isentia employees.

 

The Impact

Isentia now offers a new approach to learning that isn’t focused around generic classroom training. They’ve transformed themselves into an organization that values all learning and promotes career development, on all levels.

 

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In the first three months, 36% of the Isentia workforce is active on Degreed. Collectively, they have completed 1800 pieces of learning content and 12 full learning pathways. Contrast this to the previous quarter where in the same period they were only able to deliver 28 classroom sessions to 17% of employees. Clearly the platform is opening up learning opportunities for the team.

In addition to opening up learning opportunities, employees are sharing their expertise with each other. Degreed Pathways are curated collections of content focusing on a particular topic or skill. Pathway creation is being crowdsourced at Isentia. Experts in every department are building pathways of learning content and sharing them with the rest of the organization. Content for these Pathways are being pulled from a variety of sources and content providers. Pathway creators are able to mix classroom-based training with online content plus proprietary content made by Isentia employees, and combine it all into one learning Pathway.

 

The Takeaways

Isentia successfully embraced learning as a competitive advantage. Here’s what you can learn from their experiences:

1. Embrace the learning revolution. Classroom-based training alone isn’t enough for today’s fast-paced industries, or to capture how employees are really learning. Go beyond classroom training and give your employees more options to grow and progress in their careers while closing the skill gaps in your organization. Accomplish this goal with the same budget you have today by leveraging the tools of the future.

2. Enhance the ROI of your organization’s talent development activities by leveraging tools that amplify your efforts.

  1. One central location for all learning.
  2. Leverage the power of the Degreed network, the largest learning network on earth, instead of trying to buy or build all the learning content yourself.
  3. Remove the bottlenecks to learning and create new channels to meet the diverse needs of your organization.

3. Transform your organization into a learning culture that values all learning. Empower employees to find the learning that is most interesting for them by giving them the keys to the library.

Learn more about how you can make learning a competitive advantage here.

Corporate learning professionals have access to more learning content than ever before. In a recent CLO article, Josh Bersin describes the effect of the internet on the e-learning ecosystem:

“Today, we can watch an expert, jump from topic to topic, interact with the teacher, and submit real exercises and exams for evaluation online. Most community colleges and universities offer accredited courses online, and my personal experience shows they work extremely well. What does this all mean to us in corporate training? E-learning is back with a vengeance. Digital learning today is more exciting, dynamic and relevant than ever. Video, social experiences, gaming and online accreditation are all common.”

Not only has the medium of learning content diversified, the sheer amount of learning content has exploded. Degreed has cataloged over 250,000 online learning courses and 3 million informal learning activities from more than 1200 sources. Everything from live, virtual and eLearning courses to videos, MOOCs, bootcamps, articles, books, podcasts, webinars, conferences, online communities, apps and more. This content is coming from new and diverse sources, Crunchbase lists 1400+ edtech startups. In addition to traditional academic institutions bringing learning directly to individuals via the MOOCs, there’s also for-profit education providers, consulting firms, publishers, tech firms and non-profits.

The result? Here’s what the learning content landscape looks like today:

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We say that innovation is a lot like learning – it works best when you do a little bit every day. Xerox Services University (XSU) is innovating and rethinking learning in two important ways. First, by reworking learning to more closely link development to career growth. And second, by investing to build a culture of continuous, everyday learning. Both initiatives are possible because XSU is embracing the new learning ecosystem.
In this presentation, from the Human Capital Institute’s 2015 Learning and Leadership Development Conference, XSU’s VP of Learning Strategy and Delivery, Kerry Hearns-Smith, joins Degreed’s Todd Tauber to show you how she and her team are making L&D more efficient, more engaging and more empowering for Xerox Services’ employees.

Employee-Learning

Over 80% of employees are doing some kind of training activity at least once a year to brush up on existing skills or learn something new, but only 36% of L&D leaders know how their staff learn at work. To help you keep your employees engaged, we’ve looked at the research and developed a list of 5 things your employees want from your L&D program:

1. Give them clear learning goals and pathways

Spherion Staffing’s Emerging Workforce Study highlights the direct correlation between employee happiness and having clear goals and missions. The research shows that employees at companies with a clear mission and follow-through are 37% more satisfied with their training and development than those in organizations without those things. On the other hand, vague or unmeasurable goals can often lead to poor outcomes. That’s a huge waste of resources especially considering companies invest an average of $1,004 per worker in learning and development, according to Bersin by Deloitte.

2. Give them relevant training that helps them mend the “skills gap”

There are lots of debates over the scale and severity of the “skills gap,” but employees are definitely aware of its existence. More than 40% of employees surveyed by SAP and Oxford Economics are concerned that their current skills don’t measure up to what will be needed for future success; they want training that is relevant to their professional careers. That’s why 72% of employees say they value specialized training over an additional degree.

3. Give them both technical and soft skills

As employees progress through their professional pathways, their needs and preferences for learning content changes. Although the most sought-after subject area among professionals participating in training is still Computer and Technology, they increasingly desire leadership-oriented training. Yet only 38% of companies offer “soft skills”-centered training.

4. Give them autonomy over what and how they learn.

During an exclusive interview with Degreed, Tesla’s Director of Training Programs Beth Loeb-Davies explains that one of their key strategies for L&D is to to “treat people like adults and treat them with respect.” This resonates well with what most workers believe, as 92% strongly agree that employees should seek their own career development opportunities wherever they might be. In application, this means having faith in their learning abilities and giving your employees autonomy over what and how they like to learn.

5. Give them learning that fits into their schedules (or work patterns?)

When it comes to professional training, the most frequent excuse we hear is that “we don’t have time for that.” However, this doesn’t mean L&D should be left on the shelf. Even though today’s workers only have less than 1% of their workweek to devote to professional development and learning, it’s a personal priority for them to progress. Harvard Business Review Reported that one of the top 3 fears of workers was getting stuck with no development opportunities. Our research confirms this, as 48.3% of surveyed employees chose development opportunities over benefits.

By giving your employees what they want from L&D, you can create a program that best serves your employees needs and creates a true learning culture. Around here, we believe that learning cultures eat strategic learning for breakfast. Learn how Degreed can help you give employees what they want.

Innovation is a lot like learning. It works best when it’s just part of how you work . Here’s how BP shifted its learning culture, practices and infrastructure from courses to resources.

The Challenge:

In 2011, BP’s Director of Learning Innovation and Technology, Nick Shackleton-Jones, noticed that the energy giant’s onboarding program — which revolved around eight hours of e-learning courses — wasn’t actually getting new hires integrated into the company. Many felt “thrown in the deep end,” and very few completed the modules. One group told him that only 15% of what they knew came from formal training. So he started to explore how people really learn. His conclusion? “People aren’t data squirrels. They don’t work by hoarding knowledge. Rather, they look for guidance when they need it.”

The Innovation:

That realization changed everything. In 2012, BP began approaching its new employee onboarding in some radical new ways:

First, BP stopped developing conventional e-learning. “No one goes out and searches for an e-learning course,” Shackleton-Jones explains. “People go out and search for useful web sites and videos.” So he and his team started to replace courses with new kinds of resources designed to help people get up to speed more successfully, in specific moments of need — for example, step-by-step how-to guides, articles, videos featuring advice from BP employees and executives, and games, infographics and animations. A simple checklist ended up being the most popular content in the induction process.

Second, BP bypassed their LMS. Shackleton-Jones and his team wanted the solutions they came up with to be, “solutions that people choose to use …indistinguishable in quality from the best that our people see every day in their lives as consumers.” So BP designed and built an open, user-friendly portal, Discover BP, to make the content and the experience, “as simple as possible and as accessible as possible.” And they did it with a team that included marketing professionals, social media specialists, user experience designers, and digital agencies and game design studios — not just established e-learning vendors.

Finally, BP is encouraging and empowering its workers to learn like honey bees; to engage with resources, not just consume them. That’s no easy task. “Most people come to an environment like that because of what they can take, not what they can contribute,” Shackleton-Jones says. To attract learners and inspire them to contribute, he and his team started by pollinating Discover BP with 900 videos featuring BP staff from all around the business. “We’re not just pushing stuff out,” he  points out. “We’re actually taking their expertise and their learning and bringing it to a central point where it can benefit everybody.”

 

The Impact:

Discover BP has has attracted 170,000+ visits and close to a million page views since it was launched, making it the most heavily used learning content at BP. In fact, its use has spread beyond new starters. Existing staff are  leveraging the resources there to move into new roles within the company, too. Just as importantly, Shackleton-Jones says, “it showed that you could do something really quite different with online learning, and that did not have to be a miserable, cheap option. It got lots of people really excited.

That, in turn, has given BP’s learning team the credibility and the confidence to invest £2m in radically overhauling the way the company develops its 25,000 business leaders and managers. The company’s new “SatNav for leadership” initiative is extending the ideas behind Discover BP with a whole new series of portals, simulations and apps inspired by Nike’s FuelBand fitness trackers. By targeting advice, information, practice, connections and feedback at major career transition points, Shackleton-Jones and his team are now aiming to reduce the time it takes to get BP’s future leaders ready for their next roles.

 

The Takeaways:

Here are three things you can learn from BP’s new approach to learning:

  • Be a bold, decisive leader. To lead innovation, you have to take some risks. Stop doing things that don’t make sense to make room for the ones that do. Push your team to challenge the usual conventions. Inspire them to value utility as much as instruction.
  • Put informal learning first. Start by asking people, “how can we help you do your job?” — not “what should we teach you?”. Design content and experiences that help them solve their work problems. Think more like guidebooks and less like textbooks.
  • Experiment, learn, then operationalize what works. Work with new kinds of people and different kinds of partners. Try new things. And stay agile. Learn from your mistakes and invest behind what does work to scale up your successes.

 

Your Turn:

BP is not a Degreed client, but we really admire their learner-first attitude, their audacity and their ability to really — truly — reinvent how learning works for their workforce. How is your L&D organization innovating?

Degreed is a next generation continuous learning platform that can help you put learners first and leverage the entire learning ecosystem. Click here to start making the shift.

Innovation is a lot like learning. It works best when you do a little bit every day. Here’s some inspiration.

Image: Guitar Center

Image: Guitar Center

 

The Challenge:

After opening 80 new stores in three years, Guitar Center decided that its old way of training – “paper manuals and campfire stories” – wasn’t getting (or keeping) its 12,000 people up-to-speed fast or consistently enough. But as they looked to automate and standardize learning, the company’s L&D leaders worried that conventional training might struggle to connect with store managers and retail staff. As Guitar Center’s Director of eLearning, Chris Salles, put it, “they’re into music, guitars, gear and the rock & roll lifestyle. It can be a challenge to engage them in career development and learning.

 

The Innovation:

Guitar Center began modernizing its training like many other companies — with an LMS and a catalog of e-learning courses. Over time, however, the company’s leaders realized they needed something different. “Outside of the things we were forcing people to take as a requirement,” Salles said, “we weren’t getting a lot of action on our learning site.” Shifting from long-form courses to shorter, more bite-sized ones was a quick, simple win. Yet, Salles acknowledged, the company was still “spending 90% of our learning dollars on 10% of how people actually learn,” a reference to the 70-20-10 model.

In 2013, the company decided to pursue a more enlightened approach, emphasizing informal learning as much as formal training. As Salles described it, “we really were looking to connect with employees in ways in which they want to learn.”  So he and his team started to invest more of their time and budget into tools to facilitate and leverage collaborative learning on-the-job — things like user-generated videos, virtual meetings, online discussions, blogs and simulated practice exercises with live feedback from managers (not to mention a new mobile-ready, cloud-based learning system).

 

The Impact:

Guitar Center started to see results within the first year. Time spent on the company’s learning platform has grown to record levels. More importantly, sales metrics and employee retention have both increased. And Salles says the collaborative approach, enabled by Guitar Center’s new systems, is getting new hires up-to-speed faster and helping all of the retailer’s staff to connect better with customers. That, he says, is “the type of thing we would never be able to put into a formal learning process.”

 

The Takeaways:

Here are three things you can learn from Guitar Center’s new approach to L&D:

  • Connect with learners by re-focusing L&D on how people really learn in your organization. But start by linking your infrastructure and programs to critical business priorities.

 

Your Turn:

Guitar center is not a Degreed client, but we love how Guitar Center’s L&D leaders put learners first. We applaud their agility in changing course. And we admire their grit in reinventing how learning works for their workforce. How is your L&D organization innovating?
Degreed is a new continuous learning platform that can help you put learners first and leverage the entire learning ecosystem. Click here to start making the shift.

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