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It’s not a groundbreaking revelation to say that the world of corporate learning has changed. Information is everywhere: Google, YouTube, blogs, podcasts, Meetup groups, 1000+ eLearning providers, over 600 million websites with more options appearing everyday. All these options have changed how people learn, but traditional L&D tools haven’t evolved to meet those changing needs. 37% of enterprise learning applications are at least seven years old. 64% are at least four years old. [Bersin by Deloitte]. A lot has happened in the last 7 years- the very first iPad was released just 6 years ago in 2010.

If you’re running a corporate learning program, there’s a good chance you’re considering making a change. 38% of enterprise learning leaders are, according to Brandon Hall Group. Over 50% according to Adobe / Frost & Sullivan.

You may know you want to step into the world of digital learning, but without a roadmap, this can feel daunting.

Change in any company is risky. In all large organizations, the implementation of new technology moves at a snail’s pace. You might be lucky to get a new tool up and running in 8-9 months, or longer if you want a solution that integrates multiple technologies. But, there are ways to make this easier and improve success rates.

You need a strategy that will reduce risk, be seen as a positive change in the organization, and cut costs for re-education, integrations, and migrations.

Degreed is changing the way organizations approach corporate learning investments by creating a unified learner experience that extends across all of your learning systems. Degreed can integrate disparate HR and L&D systems quickly and at low cost.

By simplifying the user experience, and connecting people to the right tools and resources at the right time – any format, from any system – Degreed helps to drive meaningful increases in everyday learning activity, from any source.

Degreed can simplify the change management process for future corporate learning initiatives in six important ways:

  1. Simplify the end-user experience. Degreed is the front-end interface for all your organization’s learning. Degreed’s unified search streamlines the user experience by integrating internal systems (such as  LMSs, TMSs and document sharing and collaboration portals) and external training content solutions with the world’s largest collection of free, open and low-cost learning tools. Implementing Degreed allows you to continue to make changes on the back-end (new or upgraded LMS, new content vendors, consolidating SharePoint sites, etc.) without impacting the end user experience. 
  2. Reduce training costs. You won’t need to train users on a new LMS or other learning system because Degreed is the front-end solution that integrates with your LMS and other content providers. Degreed has a simple, intuitive UI that doesn’t require special training.
  3. Streamline the integration of disparate systems. Degreed already has integrations with most of the top content providers, streamlining the implementation hurdles of incorporating new content vendors into your organization’s learning ecosystem, while reducing the burden on your IT staff. Degreed’s ongoing monitoring of content usage can assist you in future licensing decisions.
  4. Improve user adoption. Employees view Degreed as a benefit, which facilitates user adoption. The learner is in control, with all the options at their fingertips. Improved user adoption means more consumption of content, both the external content found in Degreed and internal LMS content.
  5. Reduce implementation time. The RFP and implementation process for an LMS is lengthy, which leaves employees without an engaging learning experience for at least 18 months. Degreed can be up and running in as little as 3 months and provide that learning experience right out of the gate, giving you time to complete your LMS implementation on the backend.
  6. Provide better information for your content buying decisions. Because Degreed tracks all learning (formal and informal), the solution can provide you with data around what content, vendors, and modalities your employees are utilizing so you know where you should (and should not) make content investments. Degreed can also help find lower cost or free resources.

Takeaways:

The world of modern learning has evolved since traditional tools were designed. Degreed is built for the complex world of modern learners, and connects all the existing pieces of the learning infrastructure, including the LMS, to the informal and social learning worlds – with a single user-friendly, learner centric point of access.

Implementing Degreed will take your corporate learning into the future, and reduce the risk and cost for future changes.

For more information visit get.degreed.com

Bersin by Deloitte recently reported that better analytics is one of the main buying criteria for new HR solutions, with good reason. The data about what your employees are learning and what they know can add huge value when making decisions for the business. This trend is only gaining more momentum as HR analytics are being used more to make business and talent decisions.

Traditional corporate learning solutions provide metrics for mandatory training, compliance, and courses offered by the LMS. You likely have insights into course enrollment and completion rates, but this is a limited view into the actual learning happening within your organization. Based on the 70:20:10 framework, the metrics offered by your traditional corporate learning solution provide insights into only 10% of the learning happening within the organization. Just imagine what you could accomplish with insights into all the learning happening at your organization.

90% of learning is happening outside of L&D, with no insight into this learning.

Workers are learning all the time and they spend the majority of this time on self-directed learning. Traditional solutions gather metrics for the once-in-while learning happening at the organization, but not the learning happening every day, week, and month.

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There are few tools that promise the ability to provide insights into all the knowledge and learning happening in the organization.

The Experience API (xAPI), an open source API in its early stages, promises the ability to track any kind of learning experience [ADL]. API stands for Application Program Interface. It allows one piece of software to talk to another software application. People are moving from SCORM to xAPI because xAPI allows you to collect more data about course usage. xAPI is a buzzword in the industry because of what it promises to offer in the way of insights into learning.

xAPI enabled courses provide more data on courses, but courses are still only a small percentage of the learning happening in your organization. One major hurdle to leveraging xAPI for all the learning happening in your organization is the IT undertaking needed to xAPI enable all of these sources. xAPI depends on other systems to track and send learning experiences to a Learning Record Store (LRS). That means every system in your organization (LMS, wiki, knowledge base, document center, helpdesk system, etc) would need to be xAPI enabled in order to gather data around employee activities in these systems, and you need to maintain an LRS system to collect all that data – a huge IT undertaking.

Another solution, a Saas offering with a turn-key implementation process that requires low IT investment, is Degreed. Degreed is xAPI enabled. It can receive xAPI actions from other systems, and we are continuing to expand support for both outgoing as well as incoming xAPI events. Degreed also offers a variety of other tools that provide line of sight into all kinds of learning happening all across your organization, whether those sources are xAPI enabled or not.

Degreed provides insights for all the learning happening in your organization

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Degreed simplifies the management and reporting of all the learning happening at your organization – regardless of source. This gives you insight into everything your employees are learning, every day – both employer-directed and self-directed learning. The reporting of articles, videos, podcasts, books, events, online courses, instructor-led-training, and more can all be compiled in one beautiful dashboard.


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Degreed offers organization-level and group-level reports, and an individual insights page for each employee.

Traditional corporate learning solutions use hours, or seat time, as a unit of measurement for employee learning – stemming from the traditional classroom-based learning approach. But this unit of measurement doesn’t quantify the actual learning happening today. We know from our research  that classroom based training occurs infrequently throughout the year, but employees are learning constantly via online searches, peers, podcasts, books, and other sources.

Degreed is the only enterprise learning solution that can normalize and summarize all learning happening in your organization using the Point System. The science behind the scoring was informed by expert Larry Rosenberger, former CEO of FICO and the man behind the science of the FICO credit score, and David Wiley PhD., a global leader in instructional design and open education.

Interested in gaining real insights into all the learning happening in your organization? Visit get.degreed.com

According to Brandon Hall Group, 61% of corporate learning and development (L&D) leaders think workers should connect with learning resources at least once-a-week to be effective in their jobs. Yet in a poll we conducted with Chief Learning Officer, barely one in four L&D leaders said their employees do that.

To help L&D teams better engage employees, Degreed recently surveyed 512 people to understand how today’s workforce really builds their skills and fuels their careers. The findings, which are summarized in a new report titled, “How the Workforce Learns in 2016”, might make you rethink three common myths about workplace learning.

Myth #1:  Workers don’t have time for learning.

Truth: They will make time to learn, if it fuels their career growth or enriches their lives.

Bersin by Deloitte has reported that 88% of L&D leaders believe employees don’t have (or make) the time to engage with corporate learning. But that’s not quite the whole story. While our survey respondents spend, on average, just 37 minutes per week on their employers’ training, they put in another 3.3 hours per week learning on their own.

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Nearly two-thirds of them say they would put in even more time if they received some kind of credit or recognition they could leverage for professional growth. Perhaps more tellingly, nearly three out of every four told us they have invested their own money in career-related development over the last 12 months – an average of $339 a year.

That all tells us that most people will readily invest in learning – if it fuels their careers or enriches their lives. So don’t just train workers to comply. Help them grow and transform.

Myth #2: Traditional training methods are obsolete.

Truth: Traditional methods are not obsolete. They’re just incomplete.

A lot of people are saying L&D is now “wildly out-of-sync” with how people learn and “the only real remedy is a revolution”. Microlearning, many believe, is the future. Well, not so fast. It is clear that bite-sized content dominates learning habits now. In any given week, 85% learn something for work through search, 69% by reading articles or blogs and 53% from videos.

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But formal training is still essential. Around 70% of people we surveyed take live, virtual or e-learning courses from their employers at least once a year. Many do so every few months.

In either case, development is no longer confined to the workplace. Almost 80% now spend at least some time learning on mobile devices and 67% learn on personal time. The truth is, today’s workers learn sometimes and all the time, and from L&D as well as on their own. Make their curiosity count by blending microlearning with macrolearning.

Myth #3: The L&D function knows learning best

Truth: Responsibility for learning is shared between L&D, managers and employees.

According to CEB, L&D leaders think 4 in 5 workers are “bad at learning” – that they don’t know when to ask for help or share what they know, how to seek out relevant knowledge, or how to extract value from information. We’re not so sure.

Just 21% of people told us they rely on their L&D department when they need to learn something new for work, and only 28% said they search their employers’ learning systems. They look to their boss or mentor (69%), their colleagues (55%) or search online (47%) much more frequently when they need recommendations or answers.

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That doesn’t mean people don’t need help from L&D. In fact, those who said they have adequate guidance are more satisfied with their employer’s learning opportunities than those who don’t. What it does mean is that L&D teams have two roles now: Direct (creating, buying and delivering training) and indirect (giving self-serve L&D meaning by building an environment and culture that guides workers to the right people, experiences and resources).

What you can do

Many teams are already on their way to embracing these roles. In fact, 60% of respondents to our Chief Learning Officer webinar poll said they’re rethinking their L&D strategy in order to adapt to today’s learners. Almost half (48%) are looking to invest in new tools or technologies.

Get the research that reveals the truth about workplace learning and how today’s workforce really learns and fuels their careers. Click here to access Degreed’s full report with all the data and insights you need to empower your learners and create a thriving learning culture. Welcome to the future.

 

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You and I are victims of content overload. There is more information available to us than ever before, to the tune of 4 million inquires on Google and 2.5 million posts on Facebook every minute.

Additionally, we seem to be rushing most of the time – to work, to pick up the kids, to finish that project on schedule. It only makes sense that we would also rush our learning. In fact, new Degreed research shows that learning happens everywhere- at work, during our commutes, and personal time.

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So how do we make the most of our ultimate limited resource – time?

Curation and aggregation are two words often heard around the subject of content. There are thousands of learning options and systems, and these are two common methods of organizing the chaos.

But which is better and probably more importantly, which is going to save me time?

First, let’s examine them individually.

Aggregation is defined as “collection into an unorganized whole.” As a learning professional or someone searching for content, if “unorganized whole” doesn’t make you shudder, I don’t know what would. In perhaps more relatable terms, aggregation is selecting the certain pieces of content and then adding or grouping them into a concept. This is usually automated and based off of keyword matching.

Curation is a similar concept but typically takes it further by adding context, making sure each piece is quality and relevant. As defined by Degreed’s own curation expert, Caroline Soares, “Curation is about getting the right content to the right people at the right time. The art and science of curation is the ability to find, assemble and filter the best quality resources into a relevant learning experience.”

Curation, it would seem, is the more valuable of the two. It goes deeper than content aggregation to help sow the seeds for continuous learning by making it quick, easy and personal. The key to successful curation is having the ability to aggregate content from the many multiple, different sources available. Step two is to refine this list of content down to the highest quality gems.

When it comes to  learning, curation not only allows you the ability to produce more diverse learning options and modalities, but also save money by reducing the need for costly formal training.

Within the Degreed platform, a Pathway is a curated collection of content focusing on a particular topic or skill that can include a mix of content in any format, from any source. Pathways can be a collection of micro-learning experiences such as articles and videos, and can also include courses, books, or assessments.

The key to productive learning curation is to deliver the right content to the right people by designing pathways which are tailored to the needs of the target audience. You can do this in 6 ways:

  1. Utilize a healthy variety of different formats of content from different experts.
  2. Allow users to recommend items that are highly valuable to them and others.
  3. Empower learners to participate in the curation of content they personally want to consume.
  4. To stay on the cutting edge, include subject-matter experts from across the organization to collaborate on Pathways.
  5. Creating a clear path of progression within the learning pathway.
  6. Make it easy for the learner to find the content, an important part of curation is delivering the content at the right time.

Bonus: Track and reward progress as people begin and move through a pathway.

Click here to learn more about how you can start maximizing your learning resource with curation. 

The age of big data has landed us in a world where we expect every online experience to be personalized to our unique interests and curated for our desires.

We take for granted the personal experience presented to us on Facebook and Linkedin, the recommendations on Netflix, and personalized playlists on Spotify and Pandora. We assume online retailers will only promote relevant products to us, and get frustrated when promotions aren’t relevant.

Perhaps the best example of personalization is what you experience when you log-in to Amazon. Amazon’s product recommendations seem to hint at telepathic abilities. I see recommendations for products I had no idea existed, but once seen, I must have.

Personalization is a movement with a lot of momentum among consumer websites, and the approach has been wildly successful. In 2012, Amazon reported a 29% increase in sales in its second fiscal quarter, largely due to the personalization strategy it incorporated into every part of the purchasing process. Amazon isn’t the only one- nearly 80% of all marketers say personalization has boosted revenue.

The personalization movement for consumer websites is now spreading to enterprise software. The trend to consumerize enterprise software – making enterprise software more engaging for the end-user – is only in its early stages, but it’s on the rise. It’s becoming increasingly difficult for enterprise software companies to gain traction in organizations without creating a great user experience.

Personalization is an especially critical issue in corporate learning. Traditional learning solutions have been corporate-centric, focused on mandatory training and compliance which has resulted in low employee engagement. Half of people surveyed said they use their LMS for voluntary development once a quarter or less. Workers are more likely to turn to a colleague or Google to satisfy their on-demand learning needs [Degreed].

Personalization and an employee-centric approach to learning is an often cited trend for 2016 [L&D Global Sentiment 2016]. Research from Bersin by Deloitte highlights that improving the user experience is a main buying criteria for new HR solutions for 67% of people surveyed.

Bersin by Deloitte has published several research reports about the overwhelmed worker. We’re all bogged down with too much information, meetings, and emails. Employees cited not having enough time as the most common obstacle to workplace learning, but at the same time we all know that learning is a critical competitive advantage – something we all need to be doing to compete in today’s market. The solution is a set of tools that can streamline the learning process – deliver the right content, to the right person, at the right time.

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Personalization and Corporate Learning
Personalization in corporate learning has the potential to revolutionize what companies can offer their employees in terms of tangible career growth. Similar to the product offerings you see on Amazon, what if you were offered courses, articles, and videos that perfectly aligned with your current and future career goals – saving you the time of searching online, subscribing to blogs, or hunting across various intranet sites at your company? So why aren’t more corporate learning solutions offering a personalized approach to learning tailored to each individual’s needs? A few are.

There are three main ways to accomplish the goal of a more personal approach to corporate learning:

1. Manual recommendations – the more traditional form of personalization, L&D directed suggestions based on employee’s roles and business units. An admin or learning professional sends course recommendations to groups or individuals in the organization. Perhaps marking certain courses as mandatory. Some platforms allow managers to create personal learning plans for their direct reports.

2. Social recommendations – from friends, colleagues, or managers.

3. System recommendations – based on data about the user.

Most traditional learning solutions can answer personalization using manual tools, where L&D professionals are assigning mandatory training based on roles and business units. But this type of personalization only covers the training that is happening periodically throughout the year.

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“Social” is another hot buzzword in corporate learning, and tools to facilitate social learning recommendations are on the rise. But most of these tools lack the ability to aggregate social trends, such as learning content that is popular in your network, or popular among people who are similar to you.

With the advent of big data and better algorithms for gaining insights, algorithmic or system generated recommendations will become more prevalent, streamlining L&D activities while allowing workers to take charge of their own learning.

The future of corporate learning will also need to include personalized recommendations for more than just the formal and mandatory courses traditionally offered in an LMS. If a personalization engine only makes suggestions for formal courses, this will only benefit the user periodically throughout the year. Based on our research, we know that when workers need to learn something new for their job they don’t go to their LMS first.
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Degreed’s Approach to Personalization

Degreed has taken a new approach to corporate learning – with a platform designed to enable and empower the learner. We are facilitating personal development, in the literal sense of the word, anywhere, anytime, from any device. To accomplish this, the experience is unique for each user by leveraging all three tools of personalization: manual, social, and system generated.

Like Amazon, Degreed is able to recommend learning content you may not know existed, but once seen you know you’re interested in.

1. Manual Recommendations
Degreed offers the ability to send recommendations to an entire group or an individual. An admin can request rules so employees are assigned to pertinent groups and enrolled in relevant Pathways. An admin can also request which organization Pathways are featured more prominently in the library.

2. Social Recommendations
Degreed offers social tools for viewing and following what others are learning, so you can learn from an expert or a colleague you admire. Degreed makes it easy to join groups with like-minded learners, rate content, and join conversations, and send and receive recommendations from friends, colleagues, and managers. Not sure who to follow? Degreed will offer suggestions for people with similar interests.

3. System Recommendations
The first thing a user sees when she logs into Degreed is a dashboard of system recommendations – five items of personalized learning content tailored for each user, and refreshed daily, called ‘Today’s Learning’. These recommendations can come from either external resources or internal content sources proprietary to the organization.

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Degreed also offers a browse experience in the library similar to Netflix. The first thing a user sees when navigating to the Degreed library of content isn’t just a blank search page, the user will be given system generated recommendations by default, with the option to search if you don’t see what you want right away.

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The result is a learning solution that employees actually want to use. The average LMS has a net-promoter-score of -31%, while the average net-promoter-score for Degreed is 70.

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Takeaways
There are only a few enterprise learning software providers that utilize personalization, but just as this trend has taken over the consumer market, expect it to revolutionize the world of enterprise software as well.

In the market for a new corporate learning solution? Look for a tool that takes an innovative approach to corporate learning by building more consumer-like features, such as personalized recommendations. Today, nearly half of all online shoppers search on Amazon before making a purchase. Imagine a future where your corporate learning solution beats out online search as the most popular place for learning in your organization.

Learn more about how you can offer personalized learning at your organization here. 

What do CLO’s really need to know about the learning ecosystem and how to best engage their employees? We’ve gathered 12 powerful stats about how workers truly learn and fuel their careers to help prepare you to meet the needs of the workforce. Click here to view our full research on how the workforce learns.

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Want more? Get new research on how the workforce really learns in 2016.

ATD reports that only 38% of learning and development (L&D) professionals think they’re ready to meet the needs of tomorrow’s learners.  This doesn’t mean traditional approaches to L&D are obsolete- they just aren’t enough anymore, at least not for today’s workers. To help L&D teams better engage employees, we surveyed 512 people to understand how today’s workforce really build their skills and fuels their careers.

We’re proud to release the research that will give you an in-depth analysis, and important insights on how today’s workers really learn at (and for) work.

In the report you’ll find 5 key findings, what you can do to take advantage of them, and a simple diagnostic to help you identify how ready you are today to meet the demands of tomorrow’s workforce.

Click here to download the report. Welcome to the future.

How the Workforce Learns

 

 

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Isentia, headquartered in Sydney, with offices in 12 countries from China to New Zealand, is Asia Pacific’s leading media intelligence company. Staying on top of industry trends is a high priority for the business, because their environment changes rapidly.

 

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The Challenge

Isentia’s media intelligence services range from software-as-a-service products to highly customized media insight, digital and content agency services. This translates into a wide range of skills across sales, client servicing, media operations, analysts, creative, IT, and HR. These team members work together to deliver media monitoring, intelligence and insights to over 5,000 clients across the Asia Pacific region.

The nature of Isentia’s business means its people need to be at the forefront of media and current events. The previous learning and development program was a series of generic classroom-based courses. This approach grew ever more challenging (logistically and financially) as Isentia became more geographically diverse and the needs of different functional areas moved beyond the standard suite of soft skills training.

Additionally, Isentia had purchased content from several top content providers like SalesDNA, Pluralsight and Lynda. There wasn’t a central location where everyone could access this content, or track usage across content providers. Isentia needed a solution that could restructure and group this training in a way that worked best for learners.

The primary challenge: find a cost-effective and impactful way to deliver relevant and tailored learning to diverse functional groups spread out across 12 countries.

 

The Solution

Helen Thomson, the Executive Director of Human Resources at Isentia, was looking for a better solution. Isentia wanted a way to empower every employee in the organization to be able to learn what they want, when they want, both for their current role and their future career aspirations – in a cost effective solution.

Helen became interested in Degreed because it offered a cost-effective, centralized learning solution that could meet the needs of the decentralized workforce at everyone’s own pace, and time zone.

With Degreed, Isentia would have the ability to:

  • Provide on-demand learning content to all of its team members regardless of their location.
  • Organize and structure learning content in meaningful ways for the team.
  • Provide a tool to their team members that genuinely empowers them to take control of their own development.
  • Crowdsource the creation of content and learning pathways using ‘experts’ within different functional areas within the organization.
  • Enable leaders and team members to recommend learning to each other and their peers.
  • Track and give credit for all learning, whether an online course, article, YouTube video, seminar attended, formal education and even on the job experience.
  • Tap into an existing ecosystem of learning content from around the world, including in content areas Isentia never would have had the capacity or funding to develop itself.
  • Create blended learning experiences that enhance the application of skills and knowledge while on the job.
  • Integrate and manage access to existing organization subscriptions to content from other online learning partners such as SalesDNA, Lynda and Pluralsight.
  • Enhance their value proposition as an employer by providing access to learning in almost any area that interests a team member.

The goal was to promote self-directed learning, and empower employees to find what they need, when they need it – giving employees the tools they need to grow and progress in their career.

Degreed’s ready-made ecosystem of content was a key solution for Isentia’s needs. Because Degreed provides content for diverse job functions, Isentia could start offering learning resources to support diverse skillsets- without breaking the budget on dedicated L&D resources to build content. Degreed also offered the ability to aggregate content from any source in a way that made the most sense for Isentia employees.

 

The Impact

Isentia now offers a new approach to learning that isn’t focused around generic classroom training. They’ve transformed themselves into an organization that values all learning and promotes career development, on all levels.

 

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In the first three months, 36% of the Isentia workforce is active on Degreed. Collectively, they have completed 1800 pieces of learning content and 12 full learning pathways. Contrast this to the previous quarter where in the same period they were only able to deliver 28 classroom sessions to 17% of employees. Clearly the platform is opening up learning opportunities for the team.

In addition to opening up learning opportunities, employees are sharing their expertise with each other. Degreed Pathways are curated collections of content focusing on a particular topic or skill. Pathway creation is being crowdsourced at Isentia. Experts in every department are building pathways of learning content and sharing them with the rest of the organization. Content for these Pathways are being pulled from a variety of sources and content providers. Pathway creators are able to mix classroom-based training with online content plus proprietary content made by Isentia employees, and combine it all into one learning Pathway.

 

The Takeaways

Isentia successfully embraced learning as a competitive advantage. Here’s what you can learn from their experiences:

1. Embrace the learning revolution. Classroom-based training alone isn’t enough for today’s fast-paced industries, or to capture how employees are really learning. Go beyond classroom training and give your employees more options to grow and progress in their careers while closing the skill gaps in your organization. Accomplish this goal with the same budget you have today by leveraging the tools of the future.

2. Enhance the ROI of your organization’s talent development activities by leveraging tools that amplify your efforts.

  1. One central location for all learning.
  2. Leverage the power of the Degreed network, the largest learning network on earth, instead of trying to buy or build all the learning content yourself.
  3. Remove the bottlenecks to learning and create new channels to meet the diverse needs of your organization.

3. Transform your organization into a learning culture that values all learning. Empower employees to find the learning that is most interesting for them by giving them the keys to the library.

Learn more about how you can make learning a competitive advantage here.

Corporate learning professionals have access to more learning content than ever before. In a recent CLO article, Josh Bersin describes the effect of the internet on the e-learning ecosystem:

“Today, we can watch an expert, jump from topic to topic, interact with the teacher, and submit real exercises and exams for evaluation online. Most community colleges and universities offer accredited courses online, and my personal experience shows they work extremely well. What does this all mean to us in corporate training? E-learning is back with a vengeance. Digital learning today is more exciting, dynamic and relevant than ever. Video, social experiences, gaming and online accreditation are all common.”

Not only has the medium of learning content diversified, the sheer amount of learning content has exploded. Degreed has cataloged over 250,000 online learning courses and 3 million informal learning activities from more than 1200 sources. Everything from live, virtual and eLearning courses to videos, MOOCs, bootcamps, articles, books, podcasts, webinars, conferences, online communities, apps and more. This content is coming from new and diverse sources, Crunchbase lists 1400+ edtech startups. In addition to traditional academic institutions bringing learning directly to individuals via the MOOCs, there’s also for-profit education providers, consulting firms, publishers, tech firms and non-profits.

The result? Here’s what the learning content landscape looks like today:

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We say that innovation is a lot like learning – it works best when you do a little bit every day. Xerox Services University (XSU) is innovating and rethinking learning in two important ways. First, by reworking learning to more closely link development to career growth. And second, by investing to build a culture of continuous, everyday learning. Both initiatives are possible because XSU is embracing the new learning ecosystem.
In this presentation, from the Human Capital Institute’s 2015 Learning and Leadership Development Conference, XSU’s VP of Learning Strategy and Delivery, Kerry Hearns-Smith, joins Degreed’s Todd Tauber to show you how she and her team are making L&D more efficient, more engaging and more empowering for Xerox Services’ employees.

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