Globalization means that an increasing number of organizations are becoming multinational. Many of Degreed’s customers are multinational organizations with offices across the globe. Degreed itself has offices in the US, Europe, and Australia. We’re excited to announce that we now offer a seamless experience for our users regardless of language or location, staying true to our mission of giving people access to the best learning resources, no matter where they are. We’re adding new languages all the time, based on client need. Here is the current list:

Languages currently supported in Degreed:
  1. Arabic
  2. Chinese Traditional
  3. Chinese Simplified (Mainland China)
  4. Chinese Simplified
  5. Czech
  6. Dutch (Netherlands)
  7. English (British)
  8. English (US)
  9. French (France)
  10. French (Canadian)
  11. German
  12. Greek
  13. Hebrew
  14. Indonesian
  15. Italian
  16. Japanese
  17. Korean
  18. Polish
  19. Portuguese (Portugal)
  20. Portuguese (Brazil)
  21. Romanian
  22. Russian
  23. Spanish
  24. Thai
  25. Turkish
  26. Vietnamese
How internationalization works

Degreed will automatically detect the user’s language based on the user’s browser settings, which can be configured by the user. For example, if the user is running a browser set to German, Degreed will detect this browser setting, and will automatically display the Degreed platform in German without the user needing to update their profile settings in Degreed. Detecting language based on browser settings is an industry standard and provides the most user friendly experience. An organization can have users running Degreed in a variety of languages, and the experience will be personalized for each user.

Internationalization of Degreed applies to the platform and not the content itself. This means that the Degreed library will always display content based on the best matches whether we support that language or not. For example, if a company loads content in the Icelandic language, and I search in the library on an Icelandic search term, I will find Icelandic content even if Degreed doesn’t support the Icelandic language for the platform.

Plans for the future

To stay up to date with the evolving needs of today’s learners, we plan to add even more languages in more locations. We’re excited to offer one more way that Degreed can make learning better and easier, and drive engagement at your organization.

We spend hours on our phones each day – checking the news, sending texts, looking at social media, reading articles… the list goes on. In fact, over half of all digital activity now takes place on mobile devices.  As web browsing increasingly moves away from our desktops, powerful tools built specifically for mobile are becoming more valuable and more common.

That’s why we created the Degreed Mobile App – to help people be more productive with the increasing amount that we are consuming content on mobile devices! With the app, learning (and tracking!) is available whenever and wherever you want it.

Here are 5 things you can do right now with the Degreed Mobile App:

  1. Learn from your Feed, which populates personalized learning content specific to you.
  2. Search for content within the app.
  3. Track all the learning you do, both from formal and informal activities, like articles and videos from anywhere on your mobile device.
  4. Get notified, view and complete assigned, saved, and recommended items.
  5. Enroll in and learn from Pathways.

Need a jumpstart or some ideas to get started? Here are 5 ways everyday Degreed users/team members are using the Mobile App.

Maggie and tracking progress
“My family watches food documentaries on Youtube, and we share to the Degreed app from our Youtube history to get credit for what we’ve learned! I also track my progress on pathways through the mobile app, especially while commuting on the train.”

Alex and productive downtime
“I’m guilty of always pulling out my phone to fill downtime. I used to waste that time on social media, but now that I have the Degreed app, I can actually use those extra minutes here and there to learn. Typically, I will save items to Degreed during the work day and then on my commute or downtime pull out my mobile device to read my saved items. I’m also big on podcasts, so I love that once the Degreed app is installed, you can mark a podcast complete as you finish it without even having to leave the podcast app.”

Devin and centralizing multiple learning sources
“I use my iPad as my main device for work and learning, which means I use a variety of different apps for consuming learning content. I make good use of the Degreed share extension to mark content complete no matter which app and device I’m using. I also appreciate getting notifications for things I care about on Degreed, such as recommendations.”

Leslie and recommendations
“My favorite things about the Degreed App are my feed and recommendations. I love that I can pull up the app and go through my feed and see what has been specially curated for me on the go. This is especially handy when waiting for appointments! As I complete my learning I love being able to recommend it out to others if it is something that I think they would enjoy as well.”

Tim and multiple device access
“Every morning with a cup of coffee, either in front of the fireplace or on my deck, I like to read one or two recommended articles and watch a  video. When I run across one that’s especially interesting or relevant, I appreciate the ability to quickly share with my team or a co-worker. I also love that the app functions so closely to the browser version.  Moving between device types is seamless.

Ready? Let’s go. Download the Degreed Mobile App for iOS or Android now.

Degreed is honored to be recognized on two recent Training Industry Top 20 lists: Top Online Learning Library Company and Top Learning Portal  Company.

Top20
“Workers today are inundated with resources. More successful learning teams are utilizing practices like curation to cut through the chaos and bring only relevant, personalized content to each employee,” said CEO David Blake. “Degreed helps people discover, curate, share, track and value all types of learning – from anywhere – all in one place. By using Degreed, L&D teams can spend less time managing and more time empowering.”

Thank you to Training Industry for the thoughtful recognition.

The world’s largest companies are pushing a digital technology agenda that is changing the way the rest of the world works. Over $ 1.7 trillion in market capitalization resides in just four digital business masters: Apple, Google, Amazon, and Facebook. It seems companies have no choice but to innovate if they want to compete and succeed and stay on the cutting edge of technology.

It takes a certain skill set and certain employee network to accomplish these goals, and many organizations are having a hard time cutting the mustard. A recent survey by the Manpower Group reports that 38 percent of businesses globally are struggling to find the right talent. Rather than wait for the talent they need to emerge from the market, enterprises need to look to their current employees first with a focus on how to internally develop the skills needed.

Degreed, Accenture and Nyenrode Business Universities are joining forces in a partnership to address three of the important challenges companies face in retaining and developing the right talent:

  1. Alignment: More successful organizations view their people as a strategic differentiator. They have a clear business strategy in place, understand what capabilities are needed and can align their digital talent development agenda with business objectives.
  2. Adaptability: The classic model of education – a burst at the start and top-ups through formal company training – does not meet the needs of today’s fast-changing business environment. At the same time, learners are finding alternative ways and sources to acquire the expertise they need. Companies need to rethink the way they enable, engage and empower the learner.
  3. Acceleration: Workers understand they need to develop new skills to remain relevant. In our survey, 85% of respondents said they would be willing to invest their free time to learn new skills. If companies invest in developing rapid reskilling programs, they can mitigate automation’s negative impact on workers.

In a combined effort, Accenture, Nyenrode, and Degreed address these challenges. The partnership aims to better exploit the window of opportunity for targeted development and enrich the learning experience with personalized learning offerings that provide academic rigor and proficiency.

“This partnership propels our mission to rotate businesses to the new and emerging opportunities of digitalization, furthering our high-value transformation services,” said Robert-Paul Doove, Senior Manager at Accenture.

Degreed supports targeted skill development to take place within the walls of an organization, by facilitating the discovery, measurement, and recognition of all learning. As explained by Degreed CEO, David Blake, “Our platform automatically connects people to relevant resources and offers an engaging user experience, stimulating people to make learning a daily habit.”

Nyenrode reinforces the learning journey for targeted learners by blending the digital, informal learning journey with their renowned strengths in the field of action based learning, expert-led masterclasses, case assignments, network events and academic rigor. “This partnership enables us to deliver innovative learning solutions to our clients,” says Diederik Slob, Program Director Professional Programs at Nyenrode Business University.

After a period of experimentation and optimization, the team is excited to start serving its first learners on their journey to become the workforce of the future before the end of the year.

To learn more, visit the Degreed website.

If you could have any superpower, what would you choose? (Don’t worry, I just pictured a 10-year-old version of myself in a cape too.) My answer to this age-old question has always been reading minds.

Maybe that wasn’t your first choice, but if you’ve ever found yourself scratching your head about how to get learners better engaged with the content you’ve provided, I’m sure it’s a power you wouldn’t mind having.

The right content for your learners can feel like a guessing man’s game. It can be hard to know what’s working, what’s not, and how to do better.

That’s where data-driven design comes in. There’s an abundance of data that can be gathered about how users are interacting with content. It’s just a matter of knowing what kind of data to look for, and how to use it to shape your learning design.

Lori Niles-Hofmann, Director of Digital Learning at Scotiabank, is a data-driven design guru. She’s a firm believer in pursuing the insights that we can’t see and leveraging multiple sources of data to identify trends to get ahead of learner needs.

What kind of data are we talking about? Likes, dislikes, most viewed content, mobile vs desktop usage, popular content length… the list goes on. All of these pieces of information are the users’ way of speaking up about what they like and don’t like – and it’s time we started listening.

As Lori says, “It is not enough to just curate and push out links. You have to have a plan to engage in online dialogue and listen to the comments from the community.” Far too often, companies offer what they think learners need and never pause to find out if it’s actually what they want.

In her eBook, Data-Driven Learning Design, Niles-Hofmann summarizes it plainly: “We can no longer push out content that we believe learners should or must digest… not when there is evidence that tells us what learners are willing to consume as digital content. Instead, it is time to be bold and give learners what they want.”

datadriven

So how exactly do we find out and deliver what learners want? Join Lori Niles-Hofmann in person at Degreed LENS for her “Upskill Yourself: Data-Driven Design Skills” workshop where she’ll discuss in-depth how to change your learning design to better suit your audience.

There has been so much change in Learning and Development in the last decade, it’s hard to imagine what the next 5 years will hold.

Consider these life-changing advances we’ve experienced in the last 10 years: in 2007, Netflix launched and the first Kindle was released, Android Software and the iPad were released in 2010 and coffee-lovers cheer, the first Keurig for home use launched in 2012.

The inventors of these technologies started their lifelong learning journeys in the same place – grade school. Did you know one teacher can impact 25 students every day and up to 4,000 students during their career? Teachers that receive quality professional development can impact student achievement by 21 percentile points. By investing in our teacher’s professional development, the return in learning is 25x.

To enrich the learning experiences of students across the United States, organizations like Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA)  are committed to offering professional development resources to K-12 computer science teachers.

In preparation for her speaking session at LENS, I recently interviewed CSTA Director of Professional Development, Marina Theodotou on the future of education and learning.

Marina believes that education is rapidly evolving, much like the shifts we’ve seen in technology. Theodotou predicts that in the next five years we will need to learn to sharpen problem-solving and social interaction skills at a faster pace to keep up with the increasing speed of information and doing business globally. These skills will also be required to differentiate ourselves from  AI robots that have already taken over activities that take 30 seconds or less.

“The way to ensure that the learning sticks is to break it down into smaller chunks and make sure it’s  implementable,” she added.

So what is CSTA doing to ensure knowledge transfer among their teachers and staff?

“Computer Science changes rapidly so we must constantly make new content and learning opportunities available to educators.  We partnered with Degreed because we can curate content and create pathways on a variety of subjects. Degreed’s daily feed serves users new content every day is especially popular. It makes teachers lives easier because they can take that content and use it in their classrooms every day,” responded Marina.

CSTA teachers appreciate the easy access to diverse learning resources. The daily feed breaks learning down into smaller activities and makes it easy for teachers to implement what they learn.

Additionally important to learning from others is the investment we make in ourselves. I asked Marina what her most memorable learning experience was and how she was applying it today.

“When I was starting my career, I was invited to lunch by the CEO of Bank of America at the time, Mr. Hugh McColl. The 1.5-hour lunch was like getting an MBA. I asked him what the 3 ingredients to success were,  he said: to succeed you need brains, guts and public speaking skills. The next day I signed up to Toastmasters International and a year later got my competent toastmaster certification. Since then, I added two more skills to the mix: heart, which includes values, emotional intelligence and empathy, and tech skills, including knowing how to code, problem-solving and navigating social media. These pearls of wisdom have carried me throughout my career over the last 25 years.”

To hear more about her learning journey and how CSTA is specifically supporting our educators, please make time to attend Degreed LENS, September 28th in Chicago. Marina Theodotou will be speaking alongside UC Berkeley and Accenture for the session Upskill, Reskill, Repeat: How to Get Ready for Career-Long Learning with UC Berkeley, Accenture, and CSTA.

Today we announced the launch of Degreed Skill Certification, a new way to measure and communicate your skills. This new offering, only available through Degreed, will score existing skills and rank expertise levels using a scientifically backed method and technology.

certified-man80

Degreed Skill Certification is a way for people to prove their expertise, regardless of how they acquired their skills.

How It’s Different From Other Certifications

  1. It’s all about skills: Degreed Skill Certification is purely skills based. You are evaluated and ranked based on submitted evidence of current skill knowledge.
  2. This is not a course: Degreed Skill Certification isn’t a training program, course, or class, but rather a credible way for you to prove what existing skills you have, regardless of how you acquired those skills.  Unlike other companies, Degreed does not funnel you into a “one size fits all” training program before certifying your skills.
  3. It’s flexible to your learning style: If you don’t like the score you receive or want to challenge yourself to get to a higher level, you can improve your skills in whatever way suits you. Take a course, get more experience, self-train using internet tutorials; use whatever resources are available to you.
  4. This doesn’t have to be a one-time certification: As you learn and develop skills, you can level up your expertise score.
  5. We’re changing the way people work: Degreed Skill Certification allows companies to benchmark the current skill levels of employees, target skill development resources to improve those skills, and then measure the improvements. Companies get codified transparency into the skills of their employees. Employees get the benefit of having their skills professionally certified.

How It Works

To get certified you will have to submit evidence of your skill mastery, have your evidence endorsed and verified, then it will be anonymously peer and expert reviewed. Now until Oct 13, 2017, we are offering a lifetime pass so you can get certified at any point in the future for no additional fee.

Why You Should Get Certified

“Degreed Skill Certification is a scalable, standardized way to rate and get recognized for the skills you have in whatever scrappy way you obtained them,” said David Blake, CEO of Degreed. “This should unlock opportunities in people’s lives because it will remove the lack of transparency between the education and labor markets. We’re looking to connect everyone to relevant, fulfilling career opportunities.”

For more information about Degreed Skill Certification, or to apply to be certified, click here.

 

Many of us have been there. You pull in to LaMars or Krispy Kreme and there is a 10×10 case full of at least 10 choices of donuts. You’ve got sprinkles, filled, iced, cake, yeast, chocolate, vanilla, maple, circle, log…the choices go on.

annie-spratt-96544

The same goes for learning. You do an online search on a subject area in which you need more information, and poof – 200,000 results. You’ve got a library of content to sift through. This many choices can be confusing and maybe even paralyzing in some cases. People think, “Where do I begin” or “How can I find the best of this?” In some spheres, we can rely on expert judgment or crowdsourcing for the initial vetting (think Consumer Reports and Amazon’s star ratings).

But here’s where curation is like donuts – both are better in moderation.

As said by the Oppenheimer AVP of Organizational Development, Patrick Osborne, “There is a diminishing return in having too much content.  One donut is a treat.  Five is a tummy ache.  Ten donuts is a trip to the ER.”

While ten donuts seems like a good idea (been there, done that!), the after effects – not so much. Same goes for content. Too many choices means the user will make no choice – they are too overwhelmed.

In a world of virtually limitless information and learning content, the curator provides a valuable service by simplifying what people see and sifting out all the noise, junk, and inferior options.

Osborne’s advice? “Measure by weight, not by volume.  Be ruthlessly selective. The curator is also a de facto editor.  She decides what people will see, and what they won’t.  There’s an awesome power and responsibility in that.”

It’s good advice, but how does the rubber hit the road? How is Oppenheimer using curation? Well, you will have to come to Degreed LENS in September and attend Patrick’s workshop, “Upskill Yourself: Curating Skills” to find out. Kidding. Kind of.

Like many organizations, Oppenheimer is increasingly hearing from individuals that they have “no time” for learning.  Patrick thinks that’s partly reality but also a statement of modern learner preference—employees want things to be as short, convenient, and interesting as we can make it.  We used to be able to sell 20-30 minute online learning programs.  Now people want 2-3 minute microlearning.

Thanks to curation, the best, most relevant resources for the individual have already been served up in a single place. Oppenheimer is now offering a much broader range of options for learners than they have in the past, and shifting resources away from developing and delivering traditional learning (or outsourcing it) and concentrating on building an infrastructure based on learner centricity.

Patrick’s favorite thing about curation? “I enjoy the challenge of the hunt and the thought that goes into crafting something well.  The mechanics of creating learning pathways are trivially simple.  The challenge (the art?) is in creating a pathway someone would willingly and voluntarily spend time using.  That requires thought and skill and creativity.”

For real this time – Patrick will be speaking about Oppenheimer’s curation journey, alongside Harley-Davidson and St. Charles Consulting Group, at Degreed LENS in September. There are still spots for the conference and his workshop – register and get more information here! Who knows – donuts may be included.

A single, integrated, all-in-one technology ecosystem may work for some organizations sometimes, but it won’t work for everyone all the time. Learning is already too fragmented, and it’s only getting more diverse and complex as new ways to learn like video, chatbots and augmented reality become mainstream.

So to future-proof their investments, innovative L&D leaders are shifting to more flexible ecosystems – dynamic networks of tools, content, platforms that work together and share data to provide workers with on-demand access to all kinds of learning, performance, and career development.

bubbles

These ecosystems are all designed differently, to fit each organization’s unique business, operations, infrastructure, and culture needs. The ones we see most often share some common features and functions:

Open: They give people access to resources from inside and outside the organization, anywhere they need, anytime they want
Diverse: They provide a diverse mix of macro-learning (like live and online courses) and micro-learning (like articles, videos, and search)
Social: They enable people to learn with, and from, their peers, managers, and mentors, as well as from external experts
Personalized: They are personalized, targeting each workers’ specific roles, career paths, and interests, as well as their skill-sets
Insights: They track and analyze learning wherever it happens — in classrooms, on computers, on tablets and smartphones, and in real life
Career-long: They give people credit for informal as well as formal learning, and they allow workers to take their data with them through their careers

The challenge is, building an always-on learning environment requires a range of tools, content, and systems. It can get complicated, and it takes work. There are literally hundreds of solutions to choose from…and a lot of them look and sound alike. Plus, they need to fit in with (or replace) your existing processes and legacy infrastructure. So where do you even start?

One place to start is by joining us at Degreed LENS! At the session, The Robots are Here: How to Navigate Next-Gen Learning Technology, Caterpillar, Mastercard and Airbnb will dive into how each organization is adapting and evolving their strategy and ecosystems to confront the digital disruption of L&D.

Tickets are selling out fast. Make sure to save your seat now.

Learning is changing faster than L&D departments can keep up:

“Fifty-six percent of current workforce skill sets do not match the changes in their company’s strategy, goals, markets, or business models.”  — ATD, Bridging the Skills Gap, 2015  

However, forward thinking CLO’s have found success creating learner-driven organizations that empower workers to share their knowledge and take ownership of their own personal development. This is a new way of thinking, leaving many L&D leaders struggling to identify the right combination of tools and skills within their teams.

As leaders look at upgrading technologies and capabilities within their organizations, there’s a legitimate fear that their leap forward won’t take them to the front — that they’ll continue to be behind their competition.

It’s an important time for corporate learning leadership to take stock of their learning investments, and create the strategies and solutions that will take them through the next decades.

So where can you start?

First, better understand the capabilities you should be optimizing for in The Buyer’s Guide to The Near Future of Learning Technology from Degreed.

 

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