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Experiential Learning at Work: A Complete Guide

Experiential Learning at Work

Most people practice experiential learning every day — they just don’t know it. From subscribing to a niche newsletter or podcast to trying out a new recipe or asking a trusted mentor for advice, experiential learning is learning by doing. It’s exploring interests (or job responsibilities) to fill gaps in our knowledge. And we all do that naturally.

In our recent research report, How the Workforce Learns, we found that workers often learn necessary and high-value skills from sources outside their companies. And unless managers have the right technology, it’s nearly impossible for them to track learning, create meaningful learning metrics, or develop truly personalized learning strategies. And instead of being rewarded for their professional development efforts, workers are expected to constantly prove what they’ve learned.

Technology like a learning experience platform (LXP), can help leaders curate learning content, track progress, and connect those to potential growth opportunities. An LXP can also light the path for people and organizations to achieve collaborative learning goals together.

We Build Skills Across URLS and IRL with Experiential Learning at Work

While experiential learning is natural, tracking that learning isn’t. But when companies apply data-backed learning measures, like behavioral science theories and enabling technology, tracking experiential learning and using that technology becomes second nature. And with that usage comes helpful feedback and data. 

And this is the moment we’ve been waiting for. What we all do — developing talent — has never been more important. According to the World Economic Forum, 54% of the world’s workforce will need significant “upskilling” or “reskilling” (that is, training and development) over the next five years. In this guide, we’ll walk you through how to make experiential learning an integral part of your business.

How the Workforce Learns: The Basics

Today, learning is a core value at young startups and large corporations alike. But it wasn’t always this way. Let’s take a look at how we got here, how we’ve evolved to bring learning into the flow of work, and how a learning and development strategy that incorporates experiential learning can benefit your business.

The Elements of a Successful Learning Strategy

From building a good learning culture and choosing the right technology ecosystem to supporting learning in the flow of work, you will need several factors to create a successful strategy. Let’s start with the key ingredients of a learning and upskilling strategy and how to build a roadmap for developing talent and skills internally. 

Building a Learning Ecosystem: Where to Begin?

Finding a learning solution that covers all the areas of experiential learning (and integrates seamlessly with your existing tech stack) can seem daunting at first. Even if you have an airtight learning and development strategy, that strategy will look a little different when put into practice. How do you choose the right learning software for your company? What do all of the industry acronyms even mean? Your learning tech questions are answered here, starting from square one.

The Business Case for Learning Technology

Here’s the elephant in the room: Experiential learning is difficult to track on its own. After all, there are wide-ranging methods for supporting it, and numerous corners of the online and offline worlds in which learning can happen. That’s why an LXP, integrated with other enterprise technology, can act as a hub where all these different learning paths intersect, integrate, and influence each other.

Good learning software takes the goal of skill development and breaks it down into smaller, actionable steps to keep people progressing. It also gathers employee data and offers analytical tools that help managers and executives uncover learning gaps and create further development opportunities. This keeps their people engaged and their company competitive. Need some resources on why learning technology is worth the cost? Check out our flowchart and FAQ page below.

Putting Your Learning Technology To Use

Learning technology works best when it’s tailored to your team’s specific goals. Once you’ve set up your integrated platform, you can start engaging employees, curating learning content, and gathering learning data. Here’s how.

How to Analyze Your Company’s Learning Data

Once you’ve become a pro at using learning technology, you’ll want to make the most of your people’s hard work and the data you’ve gathered over time. How can you track experiential learning in a way that rewards workers and encourages future learning? What are the most valuable learning metrics? Let’s dive in and explore how you can make decisions based on your proprietary learning data.

Raising the Bar of Learning Leadership

The success of learning technology depends on the people — employees, managers, and leaders — who use it. Without great learning leaders, learning technology and strategy won’t be properly adopted. Check out tactical tips for empowering learning and development professionals to create a self-sustaining cycle of learning at work. 

The Advantages of Lifelong Learning

To practice learning at work is to see learning opportunities everywhere. Once your people begin to follow the path of experiential learning, there’s no telling what new experiences will open up. Explore a few more of our favorite learning resources. 

Degreed in the Wild

Being a lifelong learner means constantly reevaluating your strategy and learning from your peers. Take a look at how some of our clients have found success in their L&D strategy with Degreed. 

Learn More About Experiential Learning at Work

Still have some questions about experiential learning at work? Don’t worry, we’re here to help.

Contact a Degreed representative to discuss us in more detail. We’d love to answer your questions.

Table of Contents

Experiential Learning at Work

How the Workforce Learns: The Basics

The Elements of a Successful Learning Strategy

Building a Learning Ecosystem: Where to Begin?

The Business Case for Learning Technology

Putting Your Learning Technology To Use

How to Analyze Your Company’s Learning Data

Raising the Bar of Learning Leadership

The Advantages of Lifelong Learning

Degreed in the Wild

Learn More About Experiential Learning at Work

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