Skills Quotient

The Solution to the CEO’s Biggest Problem

Skills Quotient

What is xAPI?

Degreed Definitions

What is xAPI?

Learning Experience

Just the Beginning

Learning Experience

Employee-Learning

Over 80% of employees are doing some kind of training activity at least once a year to brush up on existing skills or learn something new, but only 36% of L&D leaders know how their staff learn at work. To help you keep your employees engaged, we’ve looked at the research and developed a list of 5 things your employees want from your L&D program:

1. Give them clear learning goals and pathways

Spherion Staffing’s Emerging Workforce Study highlights the direct correlation between employee happiness and having clear goals and missions. The research shows that employees at companies with a clear mission and follow-through are 37% more satisfied with their training and development than those in organizations without those things. On the other hand, vague or unmeasurable goals can often lead to poor outcomes. That’s a huge waste of resources especially considering companies invest an average of $1,004 per worker in learning and development, according to Bersin by Deloitte.

2. Give them relevant training that helps them mend the “skills gap”

There are lots of debates over the scale and severity of the “skills gap,” but employees are definitely aware of its existence. More than 40% of employees surveyed by SAP and Oxford Economics are concerned that their current skills don’t measure up to what will be needed for future success; they want training that is relevant to their professional careers. That’s why 72% of employees say they value specialized training over an additional degree.

3. Give them both technical and soft skills

As employees progress through their professional pathways, their needs and preferences for learning content changes. Although the most sought-after subject area among professionals participating in training is still Computer and Technology, they increasingly desire leadership-oriented training. Yet only 38% of companies offer “soft skills”-centered training.

4. Give them autonomy over what and how they learn.

During an exclusive interview with Degreed, Tesla’s Director of Training Programs Beth Loeb-Davies explains that one of their key strategies for L&D is to to “treat people like adults and treat them with respect.” This resonates well with what most workers believe, as 92% strongly agree that employees should seek their own career development opportunities wherever they might be. In application, this means having faith in their learning abilities and giving your employees autonomy over what and how they like to learn.

5. Give them learning that fits into their schedules (or work patterns?)

When it comes to professional training, the most frequent excuse we hear is that “we don’t have time for that.” However, this doesn’t mean L&D should be left on the shelf. Even though today’s workers only have less than 1% of their workweek to devote to professional development and learning, it’s a personal priority for them to progress. Harvard Business Review Reported that one of the top 3 fears of workers was getting stuck with no development opportunities. Our research confirms this, as 48.3% of surveyed employees chose development opportunities over benefits.

By giving your employees what they want from L&D, you can create a program that best serves your employees needs and creates a true learning culture. Around here, we believe that learning cultures eat strategic learning for breakfast. Learn how Degreed can help you give employees what they want.

In our August Webinar “Bring Your Own Learning” we explored the data behind the Bring Your Own Learning trend and discussed how you can manage the BYOL shift. As part of the data we shared, 77% of employees told us that their own self-directed learning was more effective towards helping them be successful in their profession. These are adults, they know what they need and they know what their strengths and weaknesses are. When we asked people how they find new information to do their jobs, 69% of them said the first thing they do is Google it and read or watch what they find. The behavior pattern here is critical: people expect immediate answers.

The takeaway is that empowering employee learning is the next big movement in education. Those who embrace it will thrive.

How can you start to manage the shift to bring your own learning? Here are 5 ideas for supporting employee learning in the new learning ecosystem.

1. Weekly lunch and learns. These are informal opportunities to tap into the knowledge and skills of employees, by having those people share what they know with their colleagues. We’ve seen this implemented with tools like Google Hangouts or Webcasts.

2. Tuition reimbursement and recognition programs. Increasingly we’re seeing organizations thinking about these programs differently to work for informal and self-directed learning.

3. Set specific learning goals. Consider reevaluating performance management processes to connect the idea of career advancement to learning in concrete and specific ways.

4. Curate and recommend resources. Look for resources that aren’t just formal; video, articles, webinars, MOOCs. Mix a variety of formats.

5. Recognize and value all kinds of learning and development. 

Jane Hart, Founder of Centre for Learning and Performance Technologies  has said regarding the future of learning “It will not be about designing personalized training nor managing people’s learning for them, but rather supporting their own personal learning strategies.”

Bring-Y

We agree, we also believe that [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]accountability equals love. Organizations should think about guiding and empowering learning as much as they do enforcing[/inlinetweet].

Do you have more ideas for supporting employee learning? Tweet them to us @Degreed. Find out how Degreed can help you empower your learners here.

Degreed recently hosted a “BrainWeave®” discussion – on “Leveraging the New Learning Ecosystem” – at the Talent Management Exchange conference in Austin, Texas. A group of 25 L&D, talent management and leadership development executives joined us to talk about the opportunities and challenges they see in innovative, new learning solutions. Here are three things they all agreed on:

1. The new learning ecosystem is exciting, but it’s still too complicated.

Learning solutions are more diverse than ever before. There are now at least 690 LMS vendors and more than 1,200 providers of learning content – everything from live and online courses to videos, MOOCs, bootcamps, articles, books, podcasts, webinars, conferences, online communities, games and apps.

All those choices are great for learners, but they are a challenge for L&D and talent leaders. Everyone we spoke to recognizes that workers (including themselves) are embracing new learning options. Only a handful are actually putting them to work, though. Most are still trying to make sense of all these new tools.

tme_blog-01

2. Change is essential, but it’s also hard. Really hard.

Everyone agreed that learning has to be more effective, more efficient and more closely linked to job performance and career paths. But with persistently tight budgets and small staffs with limited bandwidth, nearly all of them find it difficult to try new things.

Those who have tried agreed that innovative methods and technologies don’t make L&D better, faster or cheaper all by themselves. That requires L&D professionals to think and work differently, too. Unfortunately, most said their teams don’t yet have the familiarity, capabilities or mindsets to really leverage the new ecosystem.

tme_blog-02
3. To change L&D people, you have to change the L&D people. Literally.

No one we spoke to at TME has it all figured out, but several are beginning to make good progress. In those organizations, changing the way learning and talent management operates is happening through both small, incremental evolutions and bigger, more revolutionary ideas.

Many, for example, are experimenting with novel approaches, like user-generated content, video and curation. Others are updating existing skills and hiring for new expertise — for example, experience design and web and mobile development. A few have created entirely new roles, such as marketing, product and community managers.

tme_blog-03

 

 

Tweet your thoughts and questions to @degreed, and log this article on your degreed profile!

Everyone in L&D is obsessed with innovation and leveraging new approaches to learning to get better results. In July’s Webinar we teamed up with Comcast’s Eric VanDerSluis to give you some ideas on how to get started reinventing learning content for the next-generation learners.

There is a lot of research out there on putting learners first. When you boil it down, it points to these three important changes going on in people’s learning habits.

1. From instructor-led to self-directed

The most important shift is from L&D-driven, instructor-led training to self-directed development. Degreed’s own research (which we’ve talked about before) says that the typical worker spends 4x to 5x more time learning on their own than from the training their employers provide.

What those people say works best are social learning (both from their teams and their networks), search and reading. Less than 20% of them think courses are essential for learning what they need to do their jobs or build their careers. That goes for courses they find on their own as well as the ones L&D teams build and buy for them (check out Jane Hart’s research here).

Webinar_July-01

2. From uniform to fragmented

When learners do choose their own learning, another big shift happens: They go from uniform, one-size-fits-all solutions (like LMSs, classes and courses) to a more fragmented, diverse mix. People may end up taking fewer classes and courses. But they replace or augment them with all those other things — like projects, search, articles, videos and conversations with other people.

Think about your own habits. You probably learn a little bit every day just from reading and working through problems with your colleagues. Occasionally, you go to an event (like this one) or watch a video. Every once in a while, you take a class or do a course online.

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]L&D organizations have to do more than just build, buy and deliver courses.[/inlinetweet] You also need to invest in the content and systems and capabilities to leverage that whole ecosystem.

3. From sometimes to every day

The reason you need to invest your L&D resources differently now is that learning is not an occasional event anymore. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]People are still learning, they’re just doing it differently.[/inlinetweet]

More than 70%, for example, told us they have learned something for their job from an article, a video or some other informal resource — like Google, Twitter, Quora or Flipboard — in the last 24 hours. People are increasingly empowered by apps like those to learn whatever they need whenever and wherever they want. As a result, the amount of stuff that people read has actually tripled since the 1980s.

You cannot fight that. And more enlightened, forward thinking employers aren’t trying to anymore. Instead, they are beginning to reinvent how they design and deliver learning experiences to empower and channel these new habits. You should, too.

Takeaway:

The big takeaway here is simple: [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Workplace learning needs to adapt.[/inlinetweet] And sooner would be better. Because even though learners have already moved on, 70% of L&D is still instructor-led.

From evolution to a revolution

Most people in L&D seem to be understanding the need to adapt. The consultants and analysts and pundits do, and so does the industry media; CLO just published an article called “Learning Needs a Revolution”.

Everyone is finally talking about how L&D needs to innovate. That’s good. The trouble is, not enough organizations are actually doing it for real.

Innovations and Technology

Most people equate innovation with technology. Learning professionals have more technology at their disposal now than ever before. Pair that tech with the dozens of new kinds of solutions available for creating, curating, delivering and tracking all kinds of learning, and that’s a stacked toolkit.

It’s exciting to see so many people and organizations experimenting with, and adopting, these new tools.

Innovation takes more than shiny new toys

There’s some shiny new toy every year, though. 2015 is the year of micro-learning and gamification. 2014 was MOOCs and big data analytics. Before that, it was social learning and mobile. Next year, it’ll probably be wearables and xAPI.

Unfortunately, few of these new tools seem to make it past that experimental phase to become a core part of L&D. Mobile is a prime example. Even though 64% of the workforce uses smartphones now, barely a third of employers have any mobile learning program yet, only 19% of LMS shoppers say mobile is a primary consideration and only a tiny fraction of content is accessible on mobile devices.

That’s because [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]technology and content are just tools. They don’t solve problems by themselves. That takes people.[/inlinetweet]

Innovation demands new ways of thinking, working and managing

Yes, new technology and content are essential to making learning work better, faster and cheaper. But they are useless without new ways of learning require new ways of thinking, working and managing L&D, too.

1. Learning leaders need to manage innovation differently. Figuring out how to get the most out of new methods calls for new attitudes and approaches: Embracing diversity over efficiency, moving faster, making smaller bets, and accepting failure.

2. To spread those new approaches, you’ll probably need some new operating practices, too. Recruit for new kinds of skills. Try new team structures. Build more flexible, agile processes. Adjust your metrics and incentives.

Remember: [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]You cannot create a new culture with the same old ways.[/inlinetweet]

Webinar_July-02

 

3. L&D teams will also need to build some new capabilities. Explore new tools and technologies. Start experimenting with new methods. Figure out how to segment audiences and solutions. Learn to crowdsource and curate content. Do what learning people do best: Learn!

Takeaway:

L&D professionals have more tools in their toolkits now than ever before, but new technology and content are only part of the solution. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]If you want different results, you have to do something different.[/inlinetweet]

Webinar_July-04

Comcast’s Chief Learning Officer, Martha Soehren, put that very elegantly.

 

For the full recording of July’s webinar and Eric’s story of how Comcast reinvented learning click here. For more on how Degreed can help you reinvent learning content to check us out here.

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Innovation is a lot like learning. It works best when you do a little bit every day.[/inlinetweet] Here’s some inspiration.

Image: Guitar Center

Image: Guitar Center

 

The Challenge:

After opening 80 new stores in three years, Guitar Center decided that its old way of training – “paper manuals and campfire stories” – wasn’t getting (or keeping) its 12,000 people up-to-speed fast or consistently enough. But as they looked to automate and standardize learning, the company’s L&D leaders worried that conventional training might struggle to connect with store managers and retail staff. As Guitar Center’s Director of eLearning, Chris Salles, put it, “they’re into music, guitars, gear and the rock & roll lifestyle. It can be a challenge to engage them in career development and learning.

 

The Innovation:

Guitar Center began modernizing its training like many other companies — with an LMS and a catalog of e-learning courses. Over time, however, the company’s leaders realized they needed something different. “Outside of the things we were forcing people to take as a requirement,” Salles said, “we weren’t getting a lot of action on our learning site.” Shifting from long-form courses to shorter, more bite-sized ones was a quick, simple win. Yet, Salles acknowledged, the company was still “spending 90% of our learning dollars on 10% of how people actually learn,” a reference to the 70-20-10 model.

In 2013, the company decided to pursue a more enlightened approach, emphasizing informal learning as much as formal training. As Salles described it, [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]“we really were looking to connect with employees in ways in which they want to learn.”[/inlinetweet] So he and his team started to invest more of their time and budget into tools to facilitate and leverage collaborative learning on-the-job — things like user-generated videos, virtual meetings, online discussions, blogs and simulated practice exercises with live feedback from managers (not to mention a new mobile-ready, cloud-based learning system).

 

The Impact:

Guitar Center started to see results within the first year. Time spent on the company’s learning platform has grown to record levels. More importantly, sales metrics and employee retention have both increased. And Salles says the collaborative approach, enabled by Guitar Center’s new systems, is getting new hires up-to-speed faster and helping all of the retailer’s staff to connect better with customers. That, he says, is “the type of thing we would never be able to put into a formal learning process.”

 

The Takeaways:

Here are [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]three things you can learn from Guitar Center’s new approach to L&D:[/inlinetweet]

  • Connect with learners by re-focusing L&D on how people really learn in your organization. But start by linking your infrastructure and programs to critical business priorities.
  • Get ready to invest your manpower, time and budget differently. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]New social and collaborative learning methods call for new and different kinds of content, tools and systems[/inlinetweet].
  • New technology is not enough. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]To really make innovation work in L&D, learning leaders need to change their own thinking and behavior.[/inlinetweet] Different results start with working differently.

 

Your Turn:

Guitar center is not a Degreed client, but we love how Guitar Center’s L&D leaders put learners first. We applaud their agility in changing course. And we admire their grit in reinventing how learning works for their workforce. How is your L&D organization innovating?
Degreed is a new continuous learning platform that can help you put learners first and leverage the entire learning ecosystem. Click here to start making the shift.

Employees are looking beyond what their Learning & Development (L&D) departments have to offer. And they’re choosing to learn in different ways from a much more diverse range of sources. Here’s the upside for you, though: [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Leveraging new forms and sources of content can make L&D more effective, not to mention more engaging.[/inlinetweet]

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Can you hear your workforce? They’re screaming for more diverse options.[/inlinetweet] Truth is, we all learn through a constantly changing, increasingly diverse and incredibly fragmented mix of content, feedback, and experiences – both planned and ad-hoc. So you can better engage learners (and drive performance in the process) by leveraging the entire learning ecosystem to give them more diverse options.

The way to start is to think differently about how you define learning. Most people don’t; [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]over 70% of employer-provided development is still formal, instructor-led training[/inlinetweet] (according to ATD’s latest numbers). L&D is still stuck on classes and courses. Sure, more flexible virtual classes, online courses, and MOOCs are all great steps toward making courses more accessible, but they are not enough.

Here’s why: [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Fewer than 25% of people have completed a course of any kind in the last 2 years[/inlinetweet] – not at college, not online, and not professionally. However, more than 70% of those same people say they have learned something for their job from an article, a video, or a book in the last 24 hours.

What does that tell you? People like to pick and choose different kinds of content to meet different kinds of learning needs. Even though innovative new forms of content like micro-learning, on-demand videos and gamification are more in tune with people’s habits now, simply swapping long-form courses for those snacks, fun and games still misses the bigger picture.

The bigger picture is that learning at (and for) work is not an ‘either/or’ proposition. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Learning and development are not only formal or only informal; they’re both.[/inlinetweet] We all learn through a constantly shifting mix of planned, scheduled, formal training along with regular doses of ad-hoc on-demand, social and on-the-job learning.

The thing is, a massive chunk of what we learn is informal – it’s through the books, articles, and videos we consume every day, and the context in which we apply them through work and our interactions with our peers, customers and managers. That means many L&D teams probably ought to think about rebalancing their own mixes.

OGLUHZAPGF

Here’s how you can get started and engage learners:

First, [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]give your learners more diverse options – and not just a variety of instructor-led or e-learning courses.[/inlinetweet]

Second, increase engagement by building a learning culture that really values informal learning.

Third (and this is a vital step), engage learners by opening up the line of sight into all that informal learning.

How would it change the learning environment if  your employees could see what their peers were learning about, consume that same content and easily share it with others on their teams? How would it change the learning environment if you and managers within your organization had a line of sight into all the learning employees were really doing? It would probably help you make better, smarter, more targeted investments in learning programs. It would certainly give you more insight into the problems employees are trying to solve.

Odds are, your learners are already going outside of L&D to learn on their own time (and maybe even on their own dime). And [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]if you’re not measuring and valuing informal learning, then you’re missing a big piece of the picture. [/inlinetweet]Learning cultures thrive when employees are given diverse options, shown that all their learning is valued, and empowered to consume and share learning whenever they need, however they want.

Degreed can help you offer more diverse options and empower you and your learners to leverage the entire learning ecosystem. Let’s get started!

Employees are learning differently than they were 10 years ago, and it’s time for L&D leaders to listen to the crowd and change some things. That may be uncomfortable for a lot of people in L&D, but it is unavoidable. The good news is you have choices too: You can try to change everyone else’s preferences and habits or you can change how enterprise learning works. Here are [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]7 stats that show why learning isn’t limited to L&D anymore[/inlinetweet] to help you decide:

Almost [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]70% of the people we asked told us the first thing they do when they need to learn something new for their jobs is Google it[/inlinetweet] and read or watch what they find. We are all “just Googling it”, and not just because it’s expedient. We’re doing it because, in many cases, Google is all we really need. 

– Less than 50% say they look specifically for a course, but they’re inclined to do so on their own.

– Fewer than 12% said they ask their L&D or HR department for courses or other resources.

– By a 3.5 to 1 margin, people tell us they believe their own self-directed learning is more effective in helping them be successful at work than the training provided by their employers. 

– More than 70% of the people we’ve surveyed say they’ve learned something for their job from an article, a video or a book in the last 24 hours.

-Informal learning needs to be valued more highly. Most workers told us they believe that up to 60% of the knowledge and skills they use at work come from informal learning.

-[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]4 of the top 10 learning tools are consumer social networks.[/inlinetweet] Additionally, only 4 the top 25 tools for learning are enterprise products, and only one is an LMS.

Todd-quote_7_600x600 (1)

Learning is not limited to L&D anymore. Learners are adults who have a good idea of what they need. In many cases, they say they don’t need a day-long course or even a 2-hour workshop or a 1-hour video. They just need some targeted articles and a few short video clips — just enough to get started. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]It’s time to start embracing the ‘random’, ‘just in time’, and ‘just because learning'[/inlinetweet] and open our learning and development tools to include the entire learning ecosystem.

Learn how Degreed can help you leverage the entire learning ecosystem here.

 

Todd-quote_3_600x600 (1)

You may be familiar with American Psychologist, Abraham Maslow, who developed the theory of self-actualization. In Maslow’s studies, he identified the hierarchy of needs which include five fundamental elements needed in order to reach the stage of self-actualization. These five elements are physiological needs, safety needs, love and belonging needs, esteem needs, and self-actualization needs. Maslow argues that an individual cannot be fulfilled in life unless all five elements are met, working from the bottom to the top.

Throughout life, we work towards acquiring these elements so that we can live a comfortable life. We immerse ourselves in various every day activities. One of the activities that plays a large role in our lives is work. Similarly, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs can be directly translated into our needs within our careers. Although we all have varying work schedules, we dedicate a great deal of time towards our jobs and the responsibilities they require. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]This is how the hierarchy of needs applies to our growth and happiness within the workplace.[/inlinetweet]

 

Maslows_HierachyofNeeds

 

 

  1. Physiological Needs –Air, food, drink, shelter, sleep

At work, your physiological needs include the factors that make up the work environment such as a clean working space, work supplies, technology, etc. In order to carry out tasks efficiently, you first need to have the essential tools and assets readily available. A lack of physical comfort at work can result in distraction or failure to produce work that meets the expected standards.

 

  1. Safety Needs –Protection from elements, security, order, law, stability, freedom from fear

Making sure you feel safe from any harm, whether it is mental or physical, is a significant aspect in the quality of life at work. There are various factors that play part in ensuring safety in the workforce. These factors include a reasonable income, medical/dental insurance, accommodating benefits, and proper rules and regulations implemented by Human Resources. A lack of safety or a culture of fear can lead to work-related stress which can impose major consequences both inside and outside of work.

 

  1. Love and Belonging Needs –Friendship, intimacy, affection and love, – from work group, family, friends, romantic relationships

One of the needs that could make or break your path to self-actualization at work is feeling support and a sense of belonging with people you work with. Teamwork, mentorship, and a sense of acceptance from co-workers largely affect how employees feel about the company. It is important for you to feel like you are a valuable asset to the team, and to feel that you are making a contribution towards end goals. Without the support from fellow co-workers, one can feel insignificant, isolated, and alone.

 

  1. Esteem Needs –Achievement, mastery, independence, status, dominance, prestige, self-respect, respect from others

Esteem needs go hand in hand with love and belongingness needs. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Feeling that your work matters and is recognized by others plays a large role in how you feel about yourself.[/inlinetweet] Mastering concepts and becoming an expert at what you do builds esteem. In addition,[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”] the way you present yourself at work is imperative in gaining the trust and respect from your surrounding peers.[/inlinetweet] It is also essential towards your own personal growth within a company.

 

  1. Self-Actualization Needs –Realizing personal potential, self-fulfillment, seeking personal growth and peak experiences

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Realizing your full potential by seeing your path and where it can lead you is the ultimate goal in any work experience.[/inlinetweet] Learning how and where you can apply your skills and knowledge greatly impacts the future you see yourself having. Self-Actualization within your career can result in peak experiences that make you a better employee and member of society.

 

All work experiences are a significant learning experience towards the person that you want to become and where you want to succeed. Once we achieve the fifth level of Self-Actualization, our needs are met to enable us to pursue the career of your dreams. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Where are you now? How can you push yourself to reach the next level?[/inlinetweet]

 

Tweet us your thoughts on how Maslow’s hierarchy of needs applies to your career at @degreed. You just learned about psychology and personal development, track what you learned on your Degreed profile.

 

You can find Lindsey on Twitter and LinkedIn

We know that employees are looking beyond what their Learning & Development departments have to offer. They’re choosing to learn in different ways from a much more diverse range of sources. Meanwhile, most L&D infrastructure is still geared for the same old thing – managing formal training.[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]It’s time to meet, and embrace, the new learning ecosystem.[/inlinetweet] Here’s how you can leverage it.

Start by listening to the crowd and what they’re teaching us about learning. Learning at (and for) work has changed radically. Learners are making their own choices now: [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]People spend at least 4-5x more time on self-directed learning[/inlinetweet] than on what their L&D departments build and buy. The crowd is telling us 3 major things about learning:

1. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Learners want faster, easier answers.[/inlinetweet] The easiest way to find an answer or learn something for their jobs is to Google it and watch or read what they find. We’re doing this because in many cases it’s efficient and all we really need.

2. Learners need more diverse options. They want to learn in many different ways–not just from courses and formal training programs. In fact, more than 70% of people have learned something for their job from an article, a video, or a book in the last 24 hours. Unfortunately, most of that learning is outside of the view of the L&D or HR process.

3. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Learners want to leverage the entire learning ecosystem.[/inlinetweet] Most workers told us that up to 60% of the knowledge and skills they use at work come from informal training.

In addition, 90% said they would prefer to be given credit for their own learning vs. learning at L&D or HR’s direction.

Learning ecosystem

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]We need to start valuing informal learning- which could be a big, under-leveraged tool for building learning culture.[/inlinetweet] You can try to change everyone else’s preferences and habits or you can change how L&D works.

The difficulty is that while the way we’re all learning has evolved, the way many L&D organizations invest hasn’t really. Right now most systems are set up for command-and-control, one-to-many broadcast approach. In order to put learners first, the people and processes, the programs and content, and the tools and technology systems all need to reflect this new reality.

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Say hello to the new learning ecosystem[/inlinetweet]

The tools to help you leverage it are already out there, and it’s much more than just LMSs and SharePoint sites.

Todd-quote_4_600x600 (1)

The Learning Ecosystem should include a rich mix of 3 things

Todd-quote_5_600x600 (1)

What does that look like in practice?

-Look past proprietary or vendor content. Embrace alternative formats and sources.

-[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Do more than just build, buy, and push content. Crowdsource, curate, and assemble it.[/inlinetweet] Remember that 4 of the top 10 tools for learning are consumer social networks. Empower your learners to crowdsource and assemble content too!

Todd-quote_7_600x600 (1)

-Measure more than formal training. Track, recognize, and value all kinds of learning. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]There’s no excuse: You should be recognizing and valuing all kinds of learning.[/inlinetweet] This means measuring more than formal training.

New ways of learning demand different kinds of infrastructure. Infrastructure that empowers. New tools, content and technologies are essential for re-engaging learners and reconnecting L&D to business. By focusing on some new priorities, incorporating some new approaches, and rebalancing your investments you can leverage this new learning ecosystem to make L&D better serve your learners.

If you missed the webinar get the full recording here

To discover how we can help you empower learners and leverage the entire learning ecosystem check out get.degreed.com.

Tweet your thoughts on leveraging the new learning ecosystem to @degreed

In the 1980’s Michael Santos started trafficking cocaine, which eventually resulted in a 45 year prison sentence. Michael experienced an intense change in mentality and earned a bachelor’s degree, a master’s degree, wrote 2 books longhand, married his wife, and earned six figures on the stock market- all behind bars.  Click here to read Part I of this 2 Part Series “No Excuses:  How Michael Santos Created Success in Prison”.

Screen Shot 2015-06-18 at 1.53.29 PM

Michael Santos was released from prison in 2012 after serving 26 years. He has an extraordinary outlook on life and an insatiable desire to make himself and others better. I had the opportunity to do an interview with him, one of the first things he said was “Be the change you want to see in the world!” Michael’s enthusiasm for life is infectious. There is much to value in his advice.

Can you describe your transition from the criminal mentality to using your prison sentence to learn and grow? Was it an instant change of thought or more of a slow transition?

When I was 21 years old I saw Scarface and it really influenced me. I wanted to get into that. I eventually got arrested [for dealing cocaine] when I was 23. I knew I was facing a very long sentence—possibly life without parole. My case didn’t involve any violence, but because of the war on drugs people were getting long sentences. After I was convicted, but before I was sentenced, I read the story of Socrates. Socrates was in jail, and he had an opportunity to escape. But he didn’t take it. He chose death. That story had a profound effect on me. It made me think about what I could do to make the most of my time in prison. It was an instantaneous change after I read that story. I began to think about what steps I could take to reconcile with society.

What was it that led you to pick up that book?

In jail I started to pray and ask for guidance. I didn’t pray to get out of jail, but to get me through the journey. Those prayers led me to the book, A Treasury of Philosophy—specifically the story of Socrates.

324012

I was a terrible student in school and never read books growing up. But my prayers led me to read that book. I began to think, “What would law-abiding citizens expect from me?”

That’s when I came up with a three-part plan. I was going to educate myself, contribute to society, and build a support network. If I could execute that plan, I could emerge from prison with dignity.

While you were in prison you were met with setback after setback, yet you came out victorious. What advice would you give to someone who is discouraged because of setbacks in his/her life?

I would encourage them to visualize success. Figure out the best possible outcome to their life. I started to think in the cell, not about getting through the day or the week, but about success. I would think, “What is the best possible outcome for this?” The visualization was to become a law-abiding citizen. I wanted people to see me as a good person—not just someone who made bad decisions as a youth. The more clarity I got on that, the more empowered I became.

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=”@degreed”]Don’t look at today’s struggle because then you are just focused on those struggles. Make a three-year, five-year, or ten-year plan.[/inlinetweet] Visualize what the best possible outcome is in three, five, or ten years. Then reverse engineer where you need to be and create a plan. Create a plan for what you can accomplish in a year, a month, a week, and a day and work on that. You become empowered as an individual as you move toward what you define as a victory.

Todays-Struggle_640x600

How have you adjusted your personal growth patterns now that you have more freedom?

I’m still very disciplined. I’ve been free from the Bureau of Prisons for almost two years now. I’ve found there are so many more tools to use. I got a nice Mac Pro: no more spinning ball! I’m trying to learn social media better. When I was in prison I never even sent an email. I read about it, but I never experienced it. I have a lot to learn, and I still need to master the tools that are available.

What’s next for you?

My big project right now is a new podcast that I have developed. It’s called Earning Freedom. I produce a new episode every day. On the episodes I interview formerly incarcerated people or business leaders. I’m trying to connect with more employers and formerly incarcerated people to learn from them and tell their stories.

I have also written a few simple eBooks to help individuals who have been indicted—so they can really understand the process they will be going through. I want to help them begin a deliberate path and position themselves so they can emerge successfully without letting the prison experience be a failure.

Will you be writing another book?

Yes. I will be writing a follow up to my book Earning Freedom that will have the details of my time after I was released from prison

If you haven’t read Michael’s book, Earning Freedom, I highly recommend it. You can also read more about Michael’s story or listen to his podcast here

Click here to read Part I: No Excuses: How Michael Santos Created Success In Prison

Page 15 of 17« First...101314151617
Menu