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Learning Experience

Just the Beginning

Learning Experience

Everyone knows most learning happens beyond classroom walls and outside learning management systems (LMSs). New research is finally showing just how much, and the data is startling.

Our research, conducted via two separate surveys over the last year, shows that workers spend 4x to 5x more time on self-directed learning than on what their L&D departments build and buy. They invest more than 14 hours a month, on average, learning on their own, but just two to three hours on employer-provided training.

That should matter to learning professionals because it’s the starting point for understanding not just why L&D needs to evolve – urgently – but also how. And if you watch and listen carefully, the crowd is giving us three major clues about the future of talent development. Here’s what learners really want:

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In this month’s Webinar we’re diving into how to leverage the new learning ecosystem to better serve learners. Sign up here and join us! If you’re interested in what Degreed does to leverage the new learning ecosystem click here.

In May’s “Putting Learners First” Webinar VP of Product Marketing Todd Tauber presented on the current issues with L&D approaches and how to make the shift to put learners first. In this final recap post we’ll explore reimagining L&D for learners. For the first two sections of this Webinar checkout Webinar Recap I: Why It’s Time to Rethink L&D Approaches, and Webinar Recap II: How To Make The Shift. 

Rewire L&D infrastructure to reinvent learning for learners
The hard part is doing the work to actually reinvent workplace learning. Transforming how L&D works all at once can be a huge, complicated job. It often takes months or years, depending on how complicated the organization is.

The key is not cost cutting and reorganizing, though. It’s investing time and money differently. L&D organizations only really invest in 3 things: people, content and tools.

Companies who are making this shift are approaching their content and programs very differently.
– They still do programs and classes and online courses, but they’re tilting the balance much more heavily toward experiential, social and on-demand learning experiences, with more modern formats like short videos, simulations and apps.

These companies are able to do that in large part because they’re changing their people and processes.
– Some are cleaning house and starting over, looking for new kinds of learning consultants and instructional designers who “get” the business and audiences better.
– Others are evolving, re-training their existing staff, adding new kinds of people into the mix alongside their or even creating entirely new roles.
– Several companies – for example Bank of America, EY, LinkedIn, Macy’s and Nike – now have product managers instead of (or in addition to) their LMS administrators.

The problem with different people trying to do different things is that it’s creating some new problems, those problems demand new and different kinds of technology to work better. Very few authoring tools or LMSs, for example, make it easy to create, find, access or track informal learning content or social and on-the-job learning experiences.

Make it simpler to create (and curate) learning
Most authoring tools and LMSs were designed and built for an era of one-to-many learning – the broadcast model. Now, people do a lot more than just consume; they’re also crowdsourcing and collaborating. Learning is no longer one-to-many, it’s many-to-many.

A lot of learners (and L&D teams) now need better tools for creating, curating and sharing learning.

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– Almost 90% of workers say that sharing knowledge is an important or essential part of learning what they need for their jobs.
-Only around ⅓ of employers have invested in dedicated social learning systems.

Make it faster to find learning
Creating learning is only the first step, though. Learners also need better tools for finding the right things at the right time. We are all overwhelmed by information. We are also all impatient. Especially online- if we can’t find what we want – fast – we move on.

Learning content is so easy to make, and so cheap to buy now that it’s become almost too available. Making sense of all the learning clutter out there is a growing problem.

Make it easier to access learning
Finding the right content isn’t much use if people can’t access it. One word: Mobile.
More than half of workers now say they would like to be able to access learning on mobile devices. They may not all need it to do their jobs, but they want it.

Most companies are barely scratching the surface when it comes to mobile learning. Sure, it’s encouraging that more than 70% of organizations now say they’re doing something with mobile learning. However, only 12% of learning content is actually mobile-ready.

Make it possible to track all learning
Companies that do that are just trying to stuff the toothpaste back in the tube, though. It’s become clear that both L&D organizations and individual employees need better ways to track, measure and value all of their learning.

Almost every CLO says they feel the need and urgency to demonstrate the value of their organization’s investment in L&D. In spite of that need and urgency, less than 30% of big companies capture much data on their informal learning activity. It’s hard to manage L&D when you can’t see the whole picture.

It’s also hard for individuals to act on that data. Even if they did collect it, it’s rare for employers to provide workers with easy access to information about their development beyond basic LMS transcripts.
Almost ⅔ of working professionals that we’ve surveyed say they would spend more time on informal learning if it was tracked and given professional credit of some kind.

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Takeaway 3

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Putting learners first requires new, different and better tools:
– For creating and curating learning.
– For discovering and finding learning.
– For accessing learning.
– And for valuing learning.

That means ALL kinds of learning – not just formal training. For more information on how Degreed makes it easy for organizations and their people to discover, curate, and track ALL their learning check out get.degreed.com

In today’s work environment, what you know isn’t nearly as important as how fast you can learn. With new technology emerging at an unprecedented pace, your job security depends upon the speed at which you can adapt and develop the skills your company needs to compete in the global marketplace. The good news is there are proven methods for accelerating your learning. Here are our tried techniques to get you started.

1. Increase Your Reading Speed

Well duh, you might be thinking. Reading faster would obviously accelerate anyone’s ability to learn. But as adults can we really expect to improve enough to notice a difference? According to one of the world’s leading experts on elite human performance, Tim Ferris, the answer is an emphatic YES! On his blog Ferris details how anyone can learn to read 300% faster in only 20 minutes by training their eyes to eliminate inefficient movements and avoid rereading. A few years ago I followed the method and was astonished by how much faster I began to read.

For a slightly different perspective on how to increase reading speed, check out Scott Young’s blog post from earlier this year. Being the voracious learner that he is, Young extensively researched the topic with a critical eye and concluded that training to speed-read is still worth the effort.

Several speed reading apps are also available if you do a lot of reading on a smartphone. I’ve tried nearly all of them, but the two that I’ve found most effective are ReadQuick ($9.99) and Acceleread (Free). If you use these tools as a part of your overall speed reading plan, you’ll see dramatics results in how quickly you can consume new information.

 

2. Focus on the First 20 Hours

Getting off to a good start is crucial for rapid skill acquisition. If you can push through the early stages of frustration that come with learning something new, you will usually hit your stride. In his book “The First 20 Hours,” entrepreneur Josh Kaufman provides a practical guide on how to navigate this beginning phase, and claims that you can learn the basics of any new skill in approximately 20 hours of deliberate, focused effort.

Kaufman does a great job explaining how to deconstruct a complex skill into smaller subskills that are more manageable. He urges the learner to attack the most important subskills first, using a practice regimen built around intense 15 to 20-minute study bursts. Do this 40 minutes a day for a month and you’ll pick up the fundamentals of any new skill. For more insight into these ideas, check out Kaufman’s popular TedTalk:

 

3. Optimize your Environment

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Another basic way to accelerate learning is to optimize your environment. This means turning off distractions and avoiding multitasking, which can be damaging to both your brain and your career. It means mastering your learning tools and making sure everything you need is within reach before you start a study session. It means paying attention to details like room temperature, lighting, and noise levels. It means tapping into your flow state as much as possible when you practice.

And that’s the ultimate goal, really. Getting into the flow. The sooner you get there the faster you will learn any skill.

Here’s a simple way to remember the 3 hacks you need to speed up your learning:

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As always, keep tracking everything you learn through your Degreed profile to give yourself a clear picture of all your skills and knowledge.

You can catch Jedd McFatter on Twitter and on LinkedIn.

In the ‘Putting Learners First’ Webinar, VP of Product Marketing, Todd Tauber dived into the problems with L&D approaches, what it’ll take to start putting learners first, and how to start rewiring L&D to provide what people and employers need. In Part II of the Webinar Recap: ‘Putting Learners First’ we’ll dive into what it takes to start putting learners first. Read Part I: Why It’s Time to Rethink L&D Approaches here.

1. Start putting learners first
We think that the most important shift to make here is about mindsets; it’s putting learners not just at the center, but at the beginning. That’s not as easy as it sounds. Pretty much everyone in L&D recognizes that most learning doesn’t happen inside classrooms or learning management systems (LMSs).
– The 70:20:10 learning framework – which says only 10% of learning comes from formal training, 20% from other people and 70% from experiences on-the-job – is almost 20 years old. It’s amazing, then, to see how far away most corporate L&D teams are.

The first step toward recovery is recognizing that you have a problem. When CLOs and their teams acknowledge that this is, in fact, a problem, then they start approaching a lot of things differently. They also start investing their time and budget money very differently.

2. Stop trying to command and control, and start empowering

A big one is the role and definition of L&D itself.

If you believe, for example, that the role of the organization’s learning team is to manage training and development, then you make some very different choices about some very basic questions:

Who’s responsible for driving L&D activity – HR and L&D or employees and their managers?
When and where does learning happen – on a schedule at work or anytime, anywhere?
What and why do people learn – for operational efficiency and compliance or to build strategic capabilities and performance?
How do they learn – mainly through formal classes and online courses or in the flow of their work?

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Janice Burns, the CLO at MasterCard, believes her team’s jobs are to be, “motivators and facilitators more than anything else.” And as a result, they prioritize providing people with the tools, resources and access they need to do their jobs better.

3. Stop making learning one-size-fits-all, and start offering choices
Thinking that way has prompted MasterCard to experiment with all kinds of new, unconventional approaches to learning, development and performance improvement.

Examples include:
– Creating animated role plays and games to teach new hires – especially recent college grads – compliance.
– Pairing short videos with quizzes to get new, external IT hires up to speed on the payments industry so they can do their jobs better.
– Invitations for 5-minute tutorials on people management skills directly into leaders’ calendars.
– Producing scheduled, 3 to 6-week blended learning journeys to get product managers up to speed on innovation and entrepreneurship techniques, and to diffuse infuse their marketing managers with up-to-date digital skills.

MasterCard still has an LMS and course catalog, but now they’re also acknowledging that they have an incredibly diverse workforce spread around the world – who all want and need different things. MasterCard segments those people into logical groups and then they design, develop and deliver differentiated solutions based on what makes sense for them.

By doing that, they’re giving learners as well as L&D professionals choices. Guess what? It’s working.

4. Stop making learners have to, and start making them want to.

Learners-First
Something else happens when you approach L&D from the learners’ perspectives: You tend to focus more effort on the things they care about – like leadership, soft-skills and sales. Coincidentally, these are also the things that enable strategy and drive business performance.

That doesn’t mean you don’t do the operational and compliance stuff – for example on desktop applications or proprietary processes or generic training for industry certifications. Of course you still do those things, they are still important. Higher-performing L&D organizations – the ones who are better aligned with business priorities and who deliver more effective learning more efficiently – make it a point to do them smarter.

Takeaway 2
Modernizing workplace learning demands some big shifts in how we think about L&D. And those shifts start with putting learners first.

 

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Here’s the full Webinar: Putting Learners First

 

On May 12 in our Webinar titled “Putting Learners First” VP of Product Marketing Todd Tauber discussed how the balance of power in learning and development is shifting from HR and L&D to employees and managers. Here’s why we think its finally time to start rethinking L&D approaches and priorities.

1. L&D teams are struggling to connect with learners
People’s #1 job concern is obsolescence. 60% of workers – Millennials and non-Millennials alike – think the skills they have now will NOT be what they need in 3 years (Oxford Economics / SAP, 2020 Workforce). Learning and development are essential. However, in survey after survey, those same workers say the education and training they’re getting at work is not preparing them for whatever’s next.

What’s happening? There are two things are going on here:
– A lot of people simply don’t have access to training; less than half of college grads got any formal training in their first jobs, for example.
-The bigger issue is that a lot of the opportunities people do have are not well connected to their jobs, career plans or work habits.

2. Conventional L&D is too slow to keep-up with learning needs
The proof of that is in the data. Up and down the career path, organizations say they don’t have enough people with the right knowledge and skills.
– Almost 60% of employers think new college graduates are not adequately prepared for the workforce, and many of those kids agree!
– That skills gap balloons as people move into management and leadership roles. 74% of companies report persistent shortages of talented managers.
– 51% of organizations say they don’t have a strong bench of executives.

Why is this happening? The nature of work is changing:
– Routine tasks are being automated. More and more jobs require primarily creative thinking and problem solving skills, not just the ability to follow directions. As an example, think about machine operators. They’re not just pulling levers and pushing buttons anymore- they’re programming and monitoring robots.
-Everything is changing constantly. The half-life of many skills these days is just 2.5 to 5 years. Sales and marketing is another prime example. Data, software, social media and e-commerce have fundamentally changed how people buy everything from books and clothes to enterprise software and jet engines. Those changes and the effects are still unfolding.

Products, competition and regulations can all change in a matter of weeks. Yet, it still takes 5 to 12 weeks to create just one hour of interactive e-learning. Multiply that across a typical company with dozens of job roles at multiple levels, and it’s clear that L&D can’t keep up.

3. Traditional L&D is out of sync with how people really learn
What people learn is only half the equation, though. The other half is how they keep their skills sharp. Traditional L&D practices are stuck, stubbornly, in the past.
– More than 75% of what L&D teams do is still formal training, mostly in classrooms, with instructors. While a growing portion of that is virtual classrooms and self-paced online courses, that misses the point.

-Less than ¼ of workers say they’ve completed an entire course – of any kind – in the last 24 months.

Meanwhile, more than 70% of people say they’ve learned something work-related from an article, video or book this week.

Learners-Degreed

As BP’s director of learning innovation and technology, Nick Shackleton-Jones, puts it: Most L&D organizations are only beginning to think about shifting from courses to performance support. Meanwhile, employees already rely on their networks and Google to get most of what they need informally, in the moment. And they’re starting to integrate apps into the way they work, too.

4. Learners are now empowered to take control of their own learning
The above disconnects are turning into a big problem for a lot of L&D teams because employees and their managers are increasingly empowered – largely through the Internet – to take control of their own development. If they don’t get what they need and want from their L&D or HR business partners, they’ll just go get it themselves. Many already do that. Technology training is probably the best example:
– Over the last 5 years, Chief Learning Officers have cut IT training nearly in half — from 9% of their spending to 5%. At the time when technology has become more critical to business than ever before!
– In response, Chief Technology Officers have almost doubled training, from 3% of their budgets to 5%. Keep in mind IT budgets are generally much bigger than L&D budgets.
– And on top of that, almost ⅔ of IT workers dug into their own pockets for training and certifications.

This is not limited to IT, though.
– 43% of workers say they look for learning opportunities outside their company at least half the time.

Takeaway

Learners-Degreed
The big takeaway in all this is that conventional L&D methods just aren’t responsive enough to keep up with today’s learners. So it’s time to try some new approaches. That starts with changing some pretty fundamental attitudes about the role and priorities of L&D organizations. You know the issues, and in Part II of the webinar recap we’ll make you ready to be part of the solution.

 

Here’s the full Webinar: Putting Learners First

 

When it comes to Learning and Development approaches, it’s time to put the Learner first. Here’s a quick recap if you missed our May Webinar, catch up and tweet us any questions or comments @degreed.

Let’s start with why. You may notice some problems or feel a need for change within your processes. Here’s why we think it’s time to rethink L&D priorities:

First, L&D teams are struggling to form connections with their learners. Here are the numbers: 60% of workers think the skills they have now will not be what they need in 3 years. Learning and development are clearly essential, however, 85% of employees do not feel like the training they get at work is preparing them for their next position.


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Second, the landscape of work has changed- and most current L&D systems can’t keep up with what people need to know or how people like to learn and search out information. Skills are quickly changing, more jobs require primarily creative thinking and problem solving skills- not just the ability to follow directions. What learners need to know can change in a matter of weeks, but it takes 5-12 weeks to create just one hour of interactive learning.

Learners get work-related information from articles, videos, and books weekly while traditional L&D’s are still doing mostly formal training- classroom and instructor style.

These disconnects all result in learners taking control of their own learning. Conventional L&D methods aren’t working for today’s learners- it’s time to try new approaches.

Here are 4 helpful ways to make the shift in mindset and provide learners with the information and tools they need.

1. Start putting learners first. This is a big mindshift, it means to put learners not just at the center, but at the beginning. Where they learn from others and from experiences more than they do in formal training. When you acknowledge there’s a problem in the current process, you can start working towards a solution- and investing resources differently.

2. Stop trying to command and control- start empowering. After making the shift to put learners at the beginning you’ll start to answer these questions differently about the role of the L&D department:

-Who’s responsible for driving L&D activity – HR and L&D or employees and their managers?
– When and where does learning happen – on a schedule at work or anytime, anywhere?
– What and why do people learn – for operational efficiency and compliance or to build strategic capabilities and performance?
– How do they learn – mainly through formal classes and online courses or in the flow of their work?

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3. Stop making learning one-size-fits-all, and start offering choices.

Give learners choices on the types of content they can consume. Create different options- think short videos and quizzes, 5-minute tutorials on management skills, animated role plays, etc.

4. Stop Making Learners Have To- Start Making Them Want To.

Degreed_MayWeb_2

 

Focus more effort on things learners care about-leadership, soft-skills and sales.  These are also the things that enable strategy and drive business performance. This doesn’t mean you need to stop operational and compliance stuff, it just means you need to make it a point to do them smarter.

Now that you’ve accessed the problem and had the mind-shift, it’s time to talk rewiring and getting to work.

The hard part: Doing the work to actually reinvent workplace learning. Transforming how L&D works all at once can be a huge job. It can take months and years, the key is not cost cutting and reorganizing, it’s investing time and money differently. Here are 4 tips for reinventing L&D.

1. Make it simpler to create (and curate) learning. Learning has shifted, it’s no longer broadcasted format, one-to-many. People are learning from crowdsourcing and collaborating, they’re learning many-to-many. A lot of learners need better tools for creating, curating, and sharing learning. Almost 90% of workers say sharing knowledge is an important or essential part of learning what they need for their jobs, yet only 1/3 of employers have invested in dedicated social learning systems.

2. Make it Faster to Find Learning. We’re all overwhelmed by how much information is out there, and we’re all impatient. If we don’t find what we need- and fast- we’ll move on. With so much learning content out there, it can add up to a lot of clutter.

3. Make it easier to access learning. Because making it faster to find the right content isn’t much use if your learner’s can’t access it. Make it mobile. More than half of workers say they would like to be able to access learning on mobile devices. While they may not all need it to do their jobs, they want it.

4. Make it possible to track all learning. Both L&D organizations and individual employees need better ways to track, measure, and value all of their learning. CLO’s feel the need and urgency to demonstrate the value of an organizations investment in L&D, but less than 30% of big companies capture much data on their informal learning activity. It’s awfully hard to manage L&D when you can’t see the whole picture.

It’s time to make a shift and take actions to empower learners with the right content and the right tools to learn, apply, and track it.  Here are the final 3 takeaways.

1. Conventional L&D methods just aren’t responsive enough to keep up with today’s learners or work landscape. It’s time to take new approaches

2. Modernizing workplace learning demands big shift in how we think about L&D- it starts with putting the learners first.

3. Putting learners first requires new, different, and better tools for:

-Creating and curating learning.
-Discovering and finding learning.
-Accessing learning.
-valuing learning.

And that means all kinds of learning- not just formal training. 

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What do you see in the future of L&D methods within organizations?

Degreed’s mission is to make all learning count, that’s why we make it easy for organizations and their people to discover, curate and track ALL their learning. For more information on how we do this check out get.degreed.com 

symposium

Degreed was thrilled to participate and sponsor Human Capital Media’s 2015 Spring CLO Symposium at Trump National Doral Miami. The three day conference, from April 13th – 15th, brought together over 300 learning executives.

Degreed’s COO, Chris McCarthy, and Hellman Worldwide Logistics’ Chief People Officer, Kenneth Finneran, presented an outstanding workshop on The New Generation of “Bring Your Own Learning”, What Every CLO Needs to Know. During the presentation, they explained what the consumerization of learning means and how executives can create a “learners first” culture in their organization while maintaining security and visibility. The key takeaways from the presentation included:

The learning levy has burst. People are taking learning into their own hands.

Empowering employee learning is the next big movement in education. Those who embrace it will thrive.

Accountability equals love. Empower while enforcing learning outcomes.

The workshop also included a breakout session where the 60 attendees were asked ‘What can we do as learning leaders to support and empower our learners?’ and discussed solutions in creating a learning culture in their organization.

It was an honor to have Degreed be considered as one of the elite thought leaders and solution providers in the learning and development community. The quality of sessions, speakers, organizations and networking opportunities were outstanding

Read more on the CLO symposium presentations and learning cultures with this Miami Herald Article ‘On-demand courses help employees learn on their own schedules’

Check out the Bring Your Own Learning presentation here:

 

Did you miss our webinar on Building a Learning Culture? Catch up with this wrap-up and tell us your thoughts on learning cultures by tweeting us @Degreed

First, why build a learning culture?

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In 2009 Bersin by Deloitte surveyed 40,000 organizations to see how they used various HR & training processes and how they performed on 10 business measures. They discovered “Among all the HR and training processes we study, the single biggest driver of business impact is the strength of an organization’s learning culture.” The study found the following about High-Impact Learning Cultures:

-32% more likely to be first to market

-58% more likely to have skills to meet future demand

-37% greater employee productivity

Here’s how to start building a Learning Culture that can bring lasting payoffs.

LearningCulture

Of a survey we administered, 89% of learners would rather be given credit for their own learning than learn at HR’s direction. It is an impossibility for you to know the needs, desires, goals, and real-time challenges for every individual within your organization, so how can you be expected to tailor fit learning initiatives that are top down? You can’t. It has to come from the bottom up.

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For a Learning Culture to thrive, you must give the freedom to learn to the individual. It doesn’t matter what they learn, just that they are learning. Employees have goals and desires outside of our organizations, but part of their lives is their work. This means that while people will desire to learn about things like WWII history, and deep sea diving, they will also want to learn how to become better at their jobs within our organizations. Focus on making learning social, and implement it using these 3 key principals:

1. Trust. Trust that your employees want to develop new skills, and they will spend some time learning things that will improve their jobs within your organization.

2. Empower. Empower your employees to learn with time, money, and resources. For example, at Degreed, every employee is given $100 in FlexEd money a month to support whatever learning they want.

3. Personalize. Support people’s own unique learning strategies.

When the strategy, objectives, and policies are established and communicated within the organization, the culture and action can follow.

Here are the 3 big takeaways for building learning cultures:

1. Learning cultures focus on the needs of the employee and empower them to achieve their dreams.

2. For learning cultures to develop, it doesn’t matter what people learn.

3. Alignment is achieved through strong mission, strategy, & clear objectives.

Do you have questions about building a learning culture? Tweet them to us @degreed and check out the full webinar here:

 

Deloitte University Press recently published an article titled “Reimagining higher education” which focuses on the shift towards lifelong learning and highlights Degreed’s unique capability to help shape the future of higher education.

In part it reads:

“Another firm, Degreed, assigns scores to the full range of educational opportunities available, from MOOCs and immersives to college degrees and corporate training.36 Degreed scores and validates both traditional and alternative education options to provide a credit score-like assessment of everything a student’s ever learned. This score, in turn, allows employers to make quick apples-to-apples comparisons of educational achievement across different domains.

“To lower the transaction costs associated with hiring, employers can turn to services provided by organizations that measure the full range of academic, professional, and lifelong learning options available to students from both accredited and non-accredited sources, to allow for apples-to-apples assessments of candidates’ educational track records. Tools such as Mozilla’s Open Badges platform and Degreed’s credit score system can help employers gain a more holistic understanding of a prospective employee’s educational background, which may include everything from a traditional degree to MOOCs.

“While the average student pursuing alternative education paths today has already obtained a four-year degree, it is likely that alternatives will become a first stop for many students seeking career options in a shorter timeframe and with less of a financial commitment. As low- or no-cost educational alternatives become a viable option for just-in-time learning, employers will have greater access to a growing talent pool that possesses the skills they seek.”

Deloitte also discussed the shift of enterprise learning to focus on continual learning:

“The shift to lifelong learning in turn will prompt employers to rethink their training and professional development strategies, in order to allow their employees to upgrade their knowledge and skills continuously. Currently, fewer than 45 percent of businesses have a written plan for learning.80 As such, businesses across a range of industries are looking to MOOCs and other experiential education providers to fill this role.”

Degreed has made this type of continual learning possible for enterprises. Degreed helps enterprises leverage the free and low-cost learning resources from around the web to give their employees on-demand access to the best learning materials in any subject.

To read the full article, click here.

To learn more about Degreed go to get.degreed.com

Degreed has a feature that allows groups and companies to create their own custom pathways of content.  These pathways allow you to combine any number of resources from anywhere around the web, be it courses, books, articles, or videos.  This content can also be from any number of different providers, giving ultimate flexibility in curating the best content to fit the needs of the learners.

Pathways can be used in a number of ways, including:

  • Helping employees prepare for a certification
  • Onboarding new employees
  • Outlining a path to promotion
  • Creating a step-by-step guide to learn a new skill
  • And many others!

Here’s our full guide to creating and utilizing pathways:

What is a pathway and why would you want to create one?

A pathway is a collection of learning content that can be used for sharing knowledge on a particular topic, like onboarding a new employee, or teaching someone a new skill. A pathway can include a combination of content from any source, including your organization’s proprietary content, (like courses from your LMS), eLearning courses from partners, online videos, articles, podcasts, events, or books.  If you have the pathway authoring permission, you can create a pathway and share it with your organization.

 To author a pathway:

1. Navigate to your profile, then select “Pathways”. On your Profile, Pathway page, you’ll see a list of pathways you are authoring or collaborating on. To create a new Pathway, select the first tile labeled “Create New Pathway.”

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2. Enter a Pathway name, description, and categories that describe what someone will learn about from the pathway. The Pathway name and description will help a user find your pathway in a search.

3.You can add an image to the pathway that will be displayed on the pathway tile.

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4. Edit Pathway: If you need to go back and edit the pathway, navigate to your Profile, select the “Pathway” tab, select the menu for the pathway, then select “Edit”.  Pathways you are authoring will be presented at the top of this page, while Pathways you are enrolled in will appear at the bottom of this page.

 

 

DegreedPathway35. Add Collaborators – If you would like other members of your organization to help you build the pathway, select the gear icon next to the pathway name, then select  “Add Collaborators,” then enter a name. A pathway can have as many collaborators as you like.

Collaborators will see the pathway in their pathway authoring list and will be able to edit the pathway with the same privileges as the original author. Any member of your organization can be added as a collaborator, regardless of permissions.

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6. Use search to add content to your Pathway. When you’re ready to start adding learning material to your pathway, select the “Search” option to search for content in Degreed. If the pathway is being made for the organization, you can search your organization’s internal catalog for content or you can select to search external resources.  You can search by book, course, article, or video. You can combine content from external online sources with proprietary content from your intranet. Enter a search term, and hit enter to get a list of content. Use the “Filter” option to filter by type of content, or to switch between the internal or external catalog.

Once you’ve found the content you’re looking for, drag and drop the content to your “bin”, or select the “Add to Bin” button.

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7. Add content while authoring. You can also add new content by clicking on the “Add to Bin” button. Then select whether the content you are adding is an article, video, book, course, or event. You’ll be prompted to enter the URL for the item and the additional details.

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8.  Add Content via the Degreed Extension or Bookmarklet. You can add content directly to your pathway from the Degreed Extension or Bookmarklet while browsing the internet or your internal intranet.

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9. Add content to your pathway from anywhere in Degreed you find content. Select the down arrow, then select “Add to Pathway.”

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10. Build the Pathway. Once you’ve collected content for the pathway in your bin, you can begin building your pathway. Select the option for  “Build” to begin building your pathway. Then drag and drop learning content from the bin to the pathway.

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11. Add Lessons and Sections. You can divide up your pathway into lessons and sections. You can edit the title and description of each lesson and section so learners know what to expect in each segment. To add a lesson or section, click on the “Add Lesson” or “Add Section” options at the bottom of the authoring page.

 

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Tip: When users are working on a pathway, sections appear in the left navigation of the pathway, while lessons appear in the right panel. We recommend using sections when the user is switching sub-topics in the pathway.

12. Publish to your organization. When your pathway is complete, don’t forget to publish the pathway to your organization by changing the visibility. Select the “Private to you” link to launch the publish dialog.

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13.Pathway Visibility –  The pathway will only be visible to you, in draft mode, until you select to publish the pathway to the organization. Only users with the “Author Pathways” permission are able to publish a pathway to the organization.

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When you modify the pathway visibility, you are presented with the following options:

 

  • My Profile (private): The pathway is completely private to you. Only you will see this pathway on your Profile Pathway tab.
  • My Profile (visible): The pathway is visible to anyone that can view your profile. For example, if your profile is set to “private to the org”, members of your organization can see this pathway on your profile. If your profile is public, any Degreed user can view this pathway on your profile.
  • Search results for specific groups: This pathway will be added to your organization’s internal catalog, but only searchable by the groups you specify.
  • Search results for anyone at Degreed: This pathway will be added to your organization’s internal catalog, but searchable by anyone in the organization. You can specify groups that can find this pathway using a group filter.

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If published to anyone at your organization, your pathway will appear in your organization’s internal catalog of pathways, and visible to other members of your organization.

If published to a specific group, only members of that group will be able to find the pathway in the pathway gallery.

Pathways are a great way to use a collection of learning content for sharing knowledge on a particular topic, like onboarding a new employee, or teaching someone a new skill. Head on over to Degreed to start your own pathway.

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