Establishing a Habit of Learning

In 5 Steps

Establishing a Habit of Learning

5 Ideas for Supporting Employee Learning

to Empower Your Learners

5 Ideas for Supporting Employee Learning

The Best Career Advice

From 6 Self-Made Billionaires

The Best Career Advice

The Degreed Lens event in New York was an evening of drinks, dialogue, and debate as over 150 L&D leaders came together to discuss ways to reinvent the learning experience for their organizations.

As L&D professionals, our roles have grown and changed to include so many additional things like change management, restructuring, compliance, and culture. It’s clear that learning professionals have two distinct roles now; direct and indirect.

Learning leaders at MasterCard, Xerox Services, IESE Business School, and Bersin by Deloitte, shared strategies for reinventing the learning experience in both direct and indirect ways at Lens NYC. Here are 4 things they recommend we can do to engage our learners and immediately refocus the L&D conversation.

1. Stop worrying about “completions.” Steve Boucher of MasterCard left the audience stunned when he revealed that completions aren’t one of his KPI’s; he is more worried about increased capability. No matter how it happens, your learners are learning. The better measures of learning are using metrics such as usage, recommendations to others and impact seen by the employee’s manager, as well as employee retention.

2. Increase our knowledge as L&D professionals. Within L&D, we need to grow and redevelop our own skills sets to understand things like: curation, information architecture, design thinking, and content management. If you don’t have people within L&D that understand these things, training is going to get left behind. People are going to find what they need – it is up to us to empower them to do so efficiently and effectively.

3. Empower the learner to be in charge. Too often we are worried about our employees making efficient use of their time. Your learners are adults, who will find what they need, even if you don’t give them the correct resources. If an employee is out there learning, regardless of what or how, they’re learning and that’s what matters.

4. Remember: You have a willing audience. Your employees want to grow and it’s important to engage them in the ways they find valuable. Employees report that career opportunities are twice as important to them as salary. This means that as an L&D leader, you are responsible for your people’s career mobility.

You’re not the only one struggling to keep up with all of the changing learning demands. Each panelist at Degreed Lens reported being there too. And your employees will be forgiving of the rough patches if you communicate with them through it. And there are tools out there, like Degreed, to help bring it all together.

One final thought from Josh Bersin to keep you motivated – “People are not going to do exactly what they’re told. It’s reality. So you have to create an environment that makes them want to learn. And it’s key to the success of your business. The learning curve is your earning curve.”

Here’s an exclusive look into the Lens NYC event:

What do Uber, Airbnb, Facebook, Tripadvisor, and eBay have in common? They are what Harvard Business Review refers to as network orchestrators.

Network orchestrators create value by connecting a network of peers; making things work together while solving the needs of the user in new and innovative ways.

Airbnb doesn’t own a single hotel, but they’ve created the technology that connects hosts with travelers and provide the tools to make the process as simple as possible. To accomplish this, Airbnb is an open system with a long list of integrations including: dozens of local payment systems, Facebook, Google maps, and mobile communication tools, all with a seamless user experience.

By doing this, Airbnb is revolutionizing the hotel industry. Uber is having the same effect on the transportation industry. This shift to open systems that can connect people and tools is happening across industries, and it’s coming to the learning industry as well.

 

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Lots of traditional (and new) learning solutions claim to be the one-stop shop for all learning, but today, the whole idea of a one-stop-shop for all learning doesn’t make sense, for organizations or for people. People today are literally learning all over the place – in live classrooms and online, on our own and via other people, and through content as well as experiences. This chart highlighting new research shows all the diverse places people spend their time learning.

HowWorkersLearnDaily

No one actually relies on just one provider or one medium for all their learning and development. To make learning effective, employers should pick and choose, mix and match, the best of all of it.

Your LMS likely contains some excellent custom courses and maybe lots of informal resources, too. You’re probably paying for great training programs from a handful of preferred providers, while new learning content pops up all the time, increasingly from non-traditional sources. In fact, there are thousands of  sources of content now, including podcasts, videos, books, and online articles. No matter how much content each one of these providers has, it won’t be the only place that people go for learning.

These days, learning happens all over the place with nothing to connect it all, until now. Degreed is connecting all the world’s best learning experiences – systems, content, and people – so they work better together. With Degreed you can:

  1. Connect your internal L&D solutions to the world’s largest collection of paid and open-source learning tools – 3M+ classes, courses, videos, articles, books, podcasts and more from 1,300+ providers, plus any other content partners your organization values.
  2. Connect employees to the content they need, when they need it, with playlists of personalized recommendations, goals, and groups.
  3. Connect employees with experts and peers both inside and outside your organization.
  4. Connect employees to more choices for learning with FlexED, the first flexible spending account for learning.
  5. Connect your organization to insights into all the learning that is happening in your organization, beyond corporate classrooms and LMSs.

As learning shifts to a more open system style with Degreed, L&D leaders have the opportunity to both directly and indirectly create true learning cultures within their organizations. By providing the tools that feed people’s curiosity and real learning habits, L&D, managers and employees can share the responsibility of learning, making it more effective and empowering.

Interested in connecting all the learning happening in your organization? Visit get.degreed.com or request a demo.

 

To help L&D teams better engage employees, Degreed recently surveyed 512 people to understand how today’s workforce really builds their skills and fuels their careers. The findings, which are summarized in a new report titled, “How the Workforce Learns in 2016”, might make you rethink three common myths about workplace learning.

The infographic below showcases these 3 myths and the truths behind them. You can read more about them here.

3 Myths in Workplace Learning

Admittedly, I’m somewhat of a newb to the world of podcasts. Though I have been a fan of audiobooks for years, I took my time getting into podcasts. Last year when everyone was listening to Serial while they ate their cereal, I was going strong on my serial habit of sleeping in and skipping my cereal.

Six months ago I finally caved and decided to give Serial a try. I finished season 1 in a week. It wasn’t hard for me to understand why it has shattered podcast records. And I only know that fact because of an interview I listened to last week with Ira Glass… on a podcast. I’m sincerely grateful for Sarah Koenig opening the door for me to a new avenue of learning. Once I was done with Serial, I couldn’t just stop. I began exploring other podcasts. Now I consume at least 4-6 hours of podcast content per week.

After I had worked my way through the most recent episodes of the podcasts I was familiar with, I got the the point where I had to start branching out and searching for new content. As I tried other podcasts out, I realized that liking one episode of a certain podcast didn’t always mean that I would enjoy all of the other episodes.

Originally, I just browsed for new stuff by scrolling through the top picks list on the iTunes Podcasts app. But that was time consuming. After trying out the search functionality on the app, I wished I could search a little better. I decided to look for other resources that I could use to further dial in my selections. Turns out there are some pretty good websites/apps out there to help you do just that. Here are a few of the best ones I’ve found.

 

Player.fm

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First up is Player.fm. In terms of topic-based searches, I probably like this one the best. For example, just look how it breaks out the general topics into much more specific areas. Searching through those areas not only yields a list of the top podcasts relevant to the topic, but also the most recent episodes from any podcast that talks about the topic. You can run this app right on your phone (Android only) for free. As an iPhone user, I just enjoy using the search features on the website. My favorite part is the “play later” functionality, which allows you to save individual episodes instead of having to subscribe to the whole podcast and then remember where the episode was.

 

NPR Podcast Directory

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The NPR directory only searches and references podcasts that are produced by NPR. This American Life, which is an NPR podcast, basically invented the system by which most podcasts produce content today. So it’s safe to say they know their stuff. NPR owns a pretty good share of the podcast market. You’d be hard pressed not to find something you enjoy from an NPR podcast. The site also has recommended picks and category search functions.

 

Learn Out Loud

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This site might not have the most elegant design, but it still has a ton of functionality. You can search through all kinds of categories and topics to find content that is interesting and new. A lot of content is free, but you can also access their premium content for a fee. And they don’t stop at podcasts, how do you feel about free audiobooks?

 

Stitcher

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If you’re a frequent podcast listener, you’ve probably heard of Stitcher. But for those who might not know, Stitcher is a solid way to find and curate podcast content. The name Stitcher refers to the app’s ability to “stitch” together multiple shows into a customized station playlist—kinda like Pandora for podcasts. You can also try pre-set stations that are curated by Stitcher’s editors. One of the things I like is how it tracks the movement of the top podcasts. Those insights into how a podcast is trending can help you find great content that you may have overlooked otherwise.

 

Audiosear.ch

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Audiosear.ch has some really awesome visual graphics that help you understand various metrics of current podcasts. For example, there is a frequency graph that shows you who the most mentioned people are in their podcast database. And if you are curious about how many podcasts Macauley Culkin is mentioned in, you can find that in their People Index. There is also a feature called PodLikeThat that suggests podcasts that are similar to your favorite podcasts and podcast episodes. For those who might want random podcast suggestions, there is also a Pod-A-Day email you can sign up for to get a new podcast in your inbox daily.

 

Hopefully at least one of these websites/apps will help you more easily find new podcast content that fits your taste! And don’t forget, you can track all your podcast listening on your Degreed profile!

 

 

“Intellectual growth should commence at birth and cease only at death.” ― Albert Einstein
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We believe that all learning matters, and learning happens throughout the course of our lives. We’re excited to offer one more way we’re making daily learning easier and more convenient- the Degreed app.

You’ve always been able to access Degreed.com on your phone, but we wanted to give you something tailor-made to your mobile learning habits. Today, we’ve released the power of the Degreed app, here’s a preview of what it offers:

 

DegreedApp1

It’s simple. We’ve simplified Degreed to its essence so you can dive in and start learning even when you’ve only got 2 minutes to spare.

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It’s convenient. You already consume a lot of content from your phone’s browser, but until now, you’ve had to jump through a few flaming hoops to get that content into Degreed. We felt your pain and have worked tirelessly to make it easy. Now just hit the “share” button in your browser, choose Degreed from the Share pop-up, and Save or Complete items.

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It’s social. See something you want to share with a friend? Push content from Degreed into Facebook, WhatsApp, Twitter, SMS… whatever you want.

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“People are increasingly learning informally–on the go. Everyone knows this. But what is new is the ability to leverage all of those moments of learning into something greater. To turn that into professional credit. To leverage it to learn new skills. To level up. Degreed’s mission is to make all learning matter,” explains our Co-founder & CEO, David Blake. “The Degreed app is an extension of that mission–to help make all of that mobile learning matter–in a big way, in your career and professionally with your employer.”

The iPhone app is ready today in the Apple App Store and the Android app will be on Google Play very soon (think “weeks” not “months”).

Download the app and take it for a spin, keep in mind this is Version 1. That means there will probably be some bugs hiding in there. If you come across anything wonky, send us a note at app@degreed.com.

How it all started

Not to be nostalgic about my education, but this is the type of high school I wished I’d gone to.

Earlier this month, I served as a panelist for Design Tech High School‘s Presentations of Learning, which is a 3 minute creative display by d.tech students that demonstrates reflection, growth & improvement in the practice of design thinking to the greater community (taken straight out of the pamphlet because I couldn’t have said it any better).

D.tech High School is incredibly unique in that it immerses students in technology, design thinking and project-based approaches in the classroom with personalized learning. Design thinking is especially prevalent throughout all the lessons, and all teachers go through training at the Stanford d.school before teaching a d.Lab class.

What exactly is design thinking and why is it so important?

Design thinking is a way of thinking that puts being human first. The process looks like this:

design-thinking-01

Notice that the first and fundamental step is empathy. You observe, ask questions, and conduct interviews to find out what the other person really needs. This is where your assumptions and biases are put aside and the listening ears come forward.

Then, you define the problem with a big picture perspective of what exactly the needs are that we’re trying to solve for, to ensure that we’re not climbing the ladder that’s leaning against the wrong wall.

With the constraints set, it’s time to ideate and use the imagination to come up with the craziest ideas in your wildest dreams that can solve the defined problem. This is where the students expressed they had the most trouble in – speaking up and not being embarrassed about their ideas.

Then you narrow down the ideas to a couple to prototype. This is where you get scrappy and mimic the product and experience of using the product. Common materials are cardboard, construction paper, post-its and popsicle sticks (my favorite).

Then you test your assumptions. When your assumptions are wrong, it doesn’t mean that it’s a failure. It only means that you’re one step closer to the right solutions, and it’s time to go back to the drawing board.

Design thinking is an ongoing process, not only in the sense that you continuously iterate but also that it doesn’t just stop at the classroom. Throughout the panel, questions were asked to encourage the students to think about how they can apply these concepts they learned from their projects in life and for the upcoming semesters.

I was amazed by the quality of the presentations, the creativity of the mediums they used and the variety of their projects ranging from animated gaming videos to organized camping trips to composition of a rap song (basically all the things that I’ve only dreamed about doing). It was incredibly high quality and almost unbelievable that there were so many young actresses, writers, comedians and musicians in the house.

An unexpected effect of learning

I was in for a bigger surprise though – the way the students described themselves before design thinking completely blew me away. Almost every one of their presentations started with “I was really shy….” and I couldn’t believe that was true when the student standing in front of me spoke with such confidence and ease.

That’s when it hit me. Design thinking doesn’t only change the way the mind thinks but it also transforms the personality. Being a part of the process led to confidence. Turns out that conducting interviews encouraged them to step out of their boundaries and speak to strangers. Working with others to define the problem facilitated collaboration and teamwork. Sharing all kinds of ideas took away the embarrassment and hesitation to voice what’s on their minds. Constantly prototyping and testing melted away the fear of failure. Having the type of environment to experience this led to more confidence.

Creating a learning environment

To sum it up, the students were encouraged to be bold. d.tech provides them with type of environment to experiment and fulfill their curiosities at their own pace. Classes also mirror this type of mindset, with minimal tests which can be retaken throughout the semester, leaving the rest of the time dedicated to learning by doing projects. Those who are at a slower pace than others get focused help on a specific topic they are having difficulties with and only move on once they understand it. Similar to pathways on Degreed where a variety of content in different formats (courses, books, videos, etc.) can be curated into a self-paced learning path to learn new skills, d.tech empowers personalized and self-directed learning.

From the transformations I saw in the students, it makes me think – what if the learning delivery method mattered just as much as the actual lesson content? What if learning was the core motivation rather than the occasional byproduct of rote memorization? What if education wasn’t only a tool to get into college and a job after graduating, but also a toolkit for life?

What would that look like? It’s some food for thought as we work together towards reinventing the future of education.

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Kelly Palmer, LinkedIn’s former Chief Learning Officer, recently joined Degreed to take on the newly created role as our own CLO. Kelly adds to a long roster of A-list hires from across the corporate learning, enterprise software and consumer edtech spectrum. We are incredibly excited to have her on the team and you should be, too. Here’s why…

Degreed is growing fast. We’ve already built a brilliant, diverse team of 120 designers, developers, engineers, product managers and customer success professionals to support our clients. And we’re just getting started. Bringing Kelly onboard is another meaningful investment in making sure Degreed’s talented team stays sharp and ready for more.

Equally important, Degreed is revolutionizing how enlightened employers build skills and fuel careers. Our customers – 100 of the world’s most sophisticated pioneering learning, talent and HR leaders (and counting) – want a partner who can provide more than a beautiful new technology. They’re also asking for guidance and support as they reengineer how they organize and operate their own teams.

Kelly, a recognized innovator and thought leader, is uniquely qualified to advise and coach other L&D leaders as they design and execute novel digital learning strategies. So she’s also here to help Degreed’s clients, companies like MasterCard, Microsoft, EMC and Xerox (and our friends in the learning and HR community at large) build the capabilities they need to adapt to the demands of today’s hyperkinetic workforce. She’s not alone, though.

Combined, Degreed’s highly skilled team has decades of experience building many of the leading brands in corporate learning, enterprise software and consumer education technology: Workday, Cornerstone OnDemand, SAP SuccessFactors, Microsoft, Skillsoft/SumTotal, Harvard Business Publishing, Bersin by Deloitte, IBM, MIT, Chegg, Pluralsight, Instructure and Lynda.com.

We’ve come together at Degreed to help you reinvent your learning experience. This is about more than just building an awesome new platform for developing and discovering workers’ skills. It’s about empowering people to enrich their lives, and enabling organizations to amplify their performance, by connecting all the world’s best education, training and lifelong learning resources. So all of those learning experiences can work better together for everyone.

Don’t take our word for it, though. If you’re interested in learning more about how Kelly and Degreed can help make all kinds of learning matter for your organization and your people, check out these resources from CLO magazine, Bigthink and Forbes. Then connect with Kelly on LinkedIn, and follow her on Twitter.

You can also track and follow everything Kelly is learning on Degreed.

The Challenge

Purch is a digital content and commerce company, servicing more than 100 million customers worldwide, making it the largest publisher in the tech vertical, according to comScore. Purch prides itself on its company culture, but did not have a strong learning culture. Like many companies, they wanted a learning culture that could improve employee engagement. More than just training employees, Purch wanted to promote employee progress and develop employees.

Purch hired Juli Weber early in 2015, with a mandate to build a learning culture, and implement a learning tool, like a Learning Management System (LMS). To better understand their learning needs, Juli conducted a Learning Needs Assessment. She sent a survey company-wide asking employees a list of questions to understand their learning habits, skill needs, and barriers to learning. The results were eye-opening.

When asked what was more effective in helping them to be successful in their professions, 73% of Purch’s employees said self-directed learning was more useful than employer directed training.

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The survey also showed that this self-directed learning was happening all the time – just not through conventional L&D solutions. 24% of employees said they had learned something useful from an article, blog, or video, in the last day. Almost all employees, 92%, had learned something that month.

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Even more shocking: 70% of employees were using Google to find learning first. Almost no one was going to HR for learning resources.

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The Search

Based on that assessment, Juli knew that Purch needed a solution that could empower employees with the autonomy and resources to drive their own learning. The solution needed to meet learners’ needs, not just the organization’s, enabling employees to access learning resources anytime, anywhere. A solution that went beyond merely training employees and actually helped to develop them – facilitating progression to the next job.

Other requirements for the solution included:

  • A diverse set of learning content, at low cost.
  • Integration with Lynda.com, a content provider Purch had already purchased.
  • Enterprise-network integrations, like SSO and HR system synchronization.
  • Social aspects – a tool that encouraged conversations around learning.
  • Gamification – make learning fun, was a very important requirement.
  • Personal reporting for employees and managers so they could track their progress.

“We wanted to create a learning culture that is driven by organic, autonomous, value-added learning activities, sprinkled with social aspects and fun.” Juli says.

The biggest issue with implementing just an LMS is that the LMS came empty. Purch would have to start with a blank slate, and then tell employees to wait while the training department built all the content they needed. As Juli explained, “I had to build all the courses myself, but it doesn’t make sense for me to build a course when there is material out there from trusted sources. “

Why Degreed

Then Purch stumbled upon something new, Degreed. Juli joined a Degreed webinar, and was immediately interested.

A major benefit of Degreed was that it comes with the world’s largest ecosystem of learning content with 250,000 online learning courses from the top content providers, and 3 million informal learning activities from more than 1200 sources. Everything from live, virtual and eLearning courses to videos, MOOCs, bootcamps, articles, books, podcasts, webinars, and more.

Degreed offers engagement tools, like social and gamification to help motivate employees. And, Degreed offers the organization insights to all the learning that is happening – not just the required training.

The Innovation

At one point in the decision making process someone said to Juli, “you know Degreed isn’t an LMS?” Juli’s response – “yeah, that’s the point.“ The early adopters at Purch understood what Degreed was, but there were those that were more resistant to change, that didn’t get it. The learning assessment results that Juli had gathered clearly indicated that this is how people learned. A traditional approach wasn’t going to meet the needs of their employees.

 

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Juli reviewed her options and felt like she was at a turning point. Implementing just an LMS would restrict what learning the organization could provide. She knew it would work for the here and now, but she wanted something that would be innovative and grow as the Purch grew. “I felt that if I went traditional, it would be closing a door.”

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The Impact

Now at Purch, people are learning constantly, and employees can easily track and get recognized for all their learning – the organization now has insights into what people are learning. Degreed is the central hub for all learning in the organization. That includes the articles and videos that can be found on Google, Purch compliance training, the Lynda content the company has purchased, plus a lot more.

Now, when Juli needs to create custom training, she has a better idea of what will drive the greatest impact. “If I’m going to create learning, I only spend time creating learning that really targets the needs.”

And best of all, “Degreed is so simple.” It’s easy for Juli to maintain and “people just use it, and I don’t even need to help them, which gives me time to focus on other things like compliance training. “

And when Juli does create a curriculum, leveraging Degreed results in huge time savings. Traditionally, one hour of classroom training required eight hours of development. With Degreed Pathways, Juli can curate content from the best sources. Two hours of training takes about 2 hours of development time. Now, curriculum development now takes ⅛ of the time.

The time savings is especially important, because Juli has now been promoted to a new role that encompasses both HR and learning and training responsibilities.

The Takeaways

Here are three things you can learn from Purch’s new approach to L&D:

    1. Connect with learners by running your own Learning Needs Assessment. We’ve prepared a Learning Needs Assessment you can use- enter your email in the form below and we’ll deliver it to your inbox.
    2. Create a learning culture that is driven by organic, autonomous, value-added learning activities, sprinkled with social aspects and fun.
    3. Save time and money by curating content instead of buying and building.

Ready to get started with your own Learning Needs Assessment? Enter your email below and we’ll send you the complete case study with a Learning Needs Assessment that features 19 questions that can help you better gauge the needs of your learners.


 

Many of us work on our fitness nearly every day. Imagine trying to run a marathon after taking a jog just once every few months. It’s not going to go well. The same principle applies to learning – your brain needs to “work out” too. We should treat learning the same way we treat exercise- and make it a daily habit.

There are three parallels between learning and fitness, which were presented by Giuseppe Auricchio Executive Director of the Learning Innovation Unit at IESE Business School, during Degreed’s recent Lens event in NYC

 

1. Transformation  by digital technologies.

Both fitness and learning are being transformed by digitalization. Think wearables. Think reading through a powerpoint on your tablet ahead of a sales presentation. Both are things we likely didn’t anticipate before they were invented, and both help us reach new heights.

 

2. It takes many activities to reach that common goal.

Fitness experts say you should vary your fitness routine for maximum results. The same philosophy applies to learning. More than ever, there are a significant amount of options for how you can learn, and employees are combining them to create their own maximum results. Recent research from Degreed reported that nearly 70% learn from peers or by reading articles and blogs every week, and 53% learn from videos in any given week.
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3. You’re never done being healthy and fit, and you should never be done learning.

Both activities should last for a lifetime. Enough said.

When it comes to both  fitness and learning, the right tools are a critical component to creating daily, sustainable habits. Modern technology has gifted us things like beautiful dashboards that show data and growth over time, contextualized reminders (think: time to stand up!), and social tools that let you challenge or share with your friends. These are all things that make us more productive.

But if we take a step back, we can see that this is bigger than new tech, ease of use, multiple modalities. It’s about the new opportunities that all these things together present. The opportunity to grow and make ourselves better on our own. And the reality is, it’s time for corporate learning to follow suit and empower their employees to take learning into their own hands.

 

If you aren’t sure how, Degreed can help you encourage a culture of self-directed learning, with tools to discover, curate, track, measure, and reward all career and lifelong learning activities. Success for both learning and fitness are intrinsically dependent on motivation which can be difficult to sustain. But it’s important that we keep growing and moving forward, setting goals and improving ourselves as people- and those improvements will most certainly come if we can take advantage of, and create, positive daily habits.

Disney doesn’t sell theme park tickets. GoPro doesn’t sell cameras. They sell stories.

Storytelling is the underlying narrative behind every brand. The greatest brands of our time realize that the physical products and services they offer are secondary to the way that they make us feel. We follow brands whose products fit into the picturebook story of our better selves.

In 2015, GoPro flew athletes to a storytelling camp where their training, product development, and media production teams taught the athletes how to create the best possible stories through their content. On GoPro’s instagram page, each photographer tells a story about the shot they’ve taken.

Storytelling

Stories are how we connect with others and affirm who we are. We all secretly envy that friend who manages to enthrall the dinner table with their most recent epic adventures. Beyond the dinner parties, great storytelling helps develop strong business strategies, makes you a better marketer, and helps you sell yourself as you grow your career.

Nowadays, there are dozens of online courses about storytelling, and we’ve rounded out 3 of our recent favorites.

OneMonth – Storytelling for Business

Taught by Master Storyteller Kevin Allison, from the popular podcast ‘Risk!’, this is an intensive 30-day workshop that breaks down every aspect of storytelling. Take this course if you want a deep dive on storytelling from a pro. This course registration ends on May 27th (this Friday!), so you’ll need to sign up quickly. OneMonth is also giving our readers 10% off their course by clicking this link.

IDEOU – Storytelling for Influence

From the great minds at IDEO, this course gives you a flexible tool kit for storytelling from the Design Director at IDEO who led the consultancy for brand strategy and storytelling for Marriott, Mattel, and others. You’ll learn from actual case studies from IDEO in order to build your storytelling tool kit.

Udemy – Storytelling for Public Speakers: From Zero to Hero

For a lighter introduction to storytelling, this Udemy course will give you the tools to improve your public speaking. This course is taught by Alex Glod, a trainer and TEDx speaker.

There are also hundreds of free resources across the web. Sign up for a Degreed account, search for storytelling, and start learning today.

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